RPGaDay August 18th

Demon Hunters18th) Which RPG have you played the most in your life?

In terms of total hours it would have to be Torg, I was in a long campaign of it and have run a couple of campaigns of it. Total play time would be around a year and a half of weekly sessions and GMing time would be similar. While I love the setting I’ve slowly drifted away from liking the rules, they are very much a product of their time (early 90’s) which is why I’m stoked for Torg Eternity. The update looks like it has succeeded in keeping the feel of the game while also introducing a more modern approach to many of the mechanics.

As for the one that I just keep going back to then it has to be Demon Hunters from Dead Gentlemen Productions. Again, there has been a new edition recently and while I’ve not played it as much as I’d like it does lean itself more towards my current mechanical inclinations. I can pick up that game with essentially zero notice and throw something together there and then. Plus it is just pure, unadulterated chaotic fun. Perfect for both one shots and a series of short adventures.

RPGaDay August 17th

17th) Which RPG have you owned the longest but not played?

bf_thumb600Probably some of the really niche indie games such as Best Friends by Gregor Hutton, Cold City from Contested Ground Studios or Piledrivers and Powerbombs by Prince of Darkness Games. There was a vibrant Scottish small press community during the time I lived in Glasgow so I was able to pick up a lot of games I’d otherwise never have encountered.

I like reading RPGs as much as playing them so I do tend to pick up a lot of small things here and there without necessarily expecting to ever run / play them. The downside is, as always, time. I’ve got a lot of great games that I’d love to play and even more ok games that I’d just like to give a spin. There’s always something new and with the tendency for most players to prefer campaigns it can be difficult to find people to give them a try, especially given the onus on the GM having to teach the systems.

RPGaDay August 16th

16th) Which RPG do you enjoy using as is?

I’m not sure there is a single RPG I’ve played where I haven’t wanted to tweak it in some way or another but at the same time I’ve enjoyed using most ‘as is’ and I make it a point to play at least a few sessions that way before I consider tweaking them.

In terms of the games I’ve modified the least it’s probably the lightweight indie games. Many of those are built around short term, highly structured games with a single central premise. Given those tend towards shorter experiences the desire to modify them didn’t have as long to form. That’s not to say it can’t, Project Cassandra started as a hack of Lady Blackbird and I’ve only played that once.

RPGaDay August 15th

15th) Which RPG do you enjoy adapting the most?

Cortex in its various incarnations. It cortexwas the first system that I really grokked, not just in terms of how to play but in how the different aspects of the system clicked together. It helps that from a design standpoint it is relatively modular with elements that can be slotted in or out easily. I’m really looking forward to tinkering with Cam Banks’ new Prime version of the system when it comes out and hopefully will be able to put something interesting together with it.

As I’ve slowly started tinkering with game design it’s one of the systems that I keep coming back to and I’ve got notes for a few settings that I’d like to adapt to it. First and foremost would be one centered around stuffed toys and their adventures as they try to protect their sleeping owners. Nothing too original but something that could be fun. Second was the Powers campaign, think the TV series Heroes as a good example of where this was going. We tried a short campaign of it using Classic and a bodged together mechanic for the system (where you had to roll as close to the target number as possible). That didn’t get far due to issues with both the narrative and the mechanics but it’s one that I’ve always wanted to revisit and flesh out more.

RPGaDay August 14th

14th) Which RPG do you prefer for open-ended campaign play?

Honestly this is another question where I think almost any with the exception of those designed for one shots (Fiasco etc). As I’ve already mentioned my I’m moving away from open ended play towards more focus story arcs but I think I could still run an open ended campaign so long as there was a big epic background plot that played out over the course of the game.

Torg would be a good example, no matter what the individual is adventure is the setting explicitly includes the invasion of the world by other realities. For anything else I think I would go the approach of multiple story arcs rather than open ended play. The Dresden Files novels would be a good example of this, each is self-contained but slowly come together as part of a larger narrative and rather than play it as one campaign I’d probably do it as a series of games, with each arc buffered by short breaks and other games.

RPGaDay August 13th

13th) Describe a game experience that changed how you play.

I actually have a few examples for this one but I want to focus on one, which served to codify my opinions on running convention games. The UK Student Nationals is a convention that brings together student societies from across the country for a mix of RPGs, wargames, LARP and boardgames. I went a number of times but one in particular sticks in my head for how bad one of the games was.

The convention works in that you pick categories then play two long games, one each day with the same group but different GMs. You never quite know what you’re getting, the particular year in question I’d signed up for scifi and the Saturday game was a bit of a disaster. Not horror story dickish GM disaster but a sequence of small errors that just compounded one another. The game was close to six hours long, under half way through I was building dice towers and the only reason I didn’t walk out was because I was going to be playing with the same people the very next day.

The signs were there from the start, the GM was late (not too unusual given the combo of students and drinking) and hadn’t finished the character sheets. Not one. So there went 15-20 minutes as he filled in the missing details. In the end my character turned out to be a smuggler / con-artist, with 20+ skills to his name (the game was in Hero system, I’ve no idea if this many skills was normal).

The opening to the game wasn’t much better. We were on a space station (yay) in the middle of some galactic civil war but none of us knew each other (boo). There’s bombing and we all get rounded up as suspects. Ok I think, maybe this is the central plot, that we’re all innocent and have to escape so we can prove that fact. Nope, we’re quickly cleared of the charges and then asked to work together as security for a delegation aiming to negotiate a truce.

Seriously?

So we head off on this space ship as the security team, a group of characters that don’t know one another and who were recently suspects in a major attack. Then there’s a murder, a threat from an emerging AI and an attack by a splinter group who have embedded themselves in the ships crew. A trainwreck, but a couple of things quickly become clear. The first is that both the characters and the adventure were based on a previous campaign the GM had run and the second is that only one of the characters was going to be central to the plot, the rest of us were just along for the ride.

The real kicker though? From that long list of skills I used only three or four. Total. In around 6 hours of play.

That game really changed how I looked at convention play and the extra responsibilities GMs have when running games. One of these days I might write out the mental checklist I’ve put together for convention games, the aspects that I personally think are important.

Suffice to say that was the last time I played at the Nationals. Every subsequent year I attended I did so as a GM, fully prepped and determined to run as good a game as I could.

RPGaDay 12th August

12th) Which RPG has the most inspiring interior art?

Like the cover art question difficult to answer, when it comes to art I tend to appreciate its inclusion as a whole but rarely pick it out individually. Tales from the Loop gets an honourable mention once again but I think I’ll actually go with Legend of the Five Rings. The books are, in general, gorgeous and really give a feel for the setting as a whole. I’d actually say that I think they may be up amongst the best looking RPG books I’ve had the chance to own. One of the most striking aspects is the consistency of the artwork. All high quality and in styles that mesh well with one another. Unfortunately with the transition to kickstarter I’ve come across too many games where the artwork is a mix of styles that don’t mesh or are completely different from one another due to the need to spread the load around multiple artists. It’s an unfortunately reality of being a small publisher but does (to me) stand out more than I’d have expected it would.