Project Cassandra: Kickstarter Thoughts 2

Barring any packages going missing during delivery I’ve now completed the primary fulfilment on Project Cassandra, my ZineQuest 3 kickstarter. That covers finishing the game, layout, distribution of digital copies, an initial print run and physical fulfilment. While I still have to finish the final stretch goal I wanted to provide an update to this post on how I’m feeling about the campaign, hurdles, costs etc.

But first, a promo shot.

That’s my game! In print! Honestly, when I first started work on Project Cassandra I never thought it would end up like this. I fully expected to release it as a digital only game that would hardly be noticed by anyone outside of my immediate gaming circles. The game is available now in print and PDF from my ko-fi store or just PDF from itch.io and drivethruRPG.

Some numbers

For a breakdown of backer numbers take a look back at the first post in this series. For this post I’m going to focus on production and spending.

During the campaign I stated that I was expecting the game to be around 40 pages. The final count was 52 pages, including covers, printed in full colour on 115gsm paper while the covers were 170gsm with matt lamination. Slightly heavier to give a clear difference in feel but not the 250-300gsm card stock I know a lot of people prefer for covers. For the initial print run I ordered 160 copies, coming in at a price of ~£1.30 per copy.

I decided against a higher print run than that as I’ve heard too many horror stories of people ending up with boxes of unsold books. 160 copies should cover the kickstarter backers, a missing in the post margin of 10%, a small number of copies going into retail distribution and still leave me with ~20 copies to sell directly. Selling those final few copies would also cover the cost of a second printing should I decide there’s enough demand for one.

Sadly, when the initial print run arrived I discovered that 30 of the 160 were damaged by scratch marks on the covers. While not a significant visual issue the problem was very obvious to the touch due to the lamination. Thankfully Mixam were quick to respond to the issue and did a replacement print run, which arrived within 2 days of being submitted. Excellent customer support and ensures I’ll look into using them again in the future.

Post Kickstarter the game is on sale at a RRP of £6 for digital or £10+p&p for the print edition, including a digital download. Conventional wisdom seems to be that print copies should sell for approximately 10x the cost of the actual printing so based on that logic £13 would be a better price. I’ve gone for £10 for a couple of reasons. Firstly, I think that’s a fair price given the size and what other games in shops tend to go for.

Second, this was primarily a vanity project. While I would like to make a micro-business from publishing games Project Cassandra was written as a labour of love so the profit margin was never a driving factor. I could have opted for black and white printing or keeping to that original 40 page estimate but I wanted the game to be the best I could make it. That’s not to say I wouldn’t like it to continue to be successful but knowing what the average ZineQuest campaign earns it was never going to earn back all the labour that went into it.

So what about the costs?

If you remember I put together an initial Kickstarter goal of £400, which broke down roughly as so:

Lets look at this in detail. I budgeted printing costs at £1.50 per unit, shipping at £2 for UK backers and £5 for international backers. All of these were slightly over my true estimates to provide a small safety net at every level. The print tier was priced at £10 during the Kickstarter which included the shipping for UK backers while the rest of the world paid a £3 surcharge top top it up to the £5 I’d budgeted for.

Fixed costs included part of the editing (with the remainder paid for by profits from previous projects), a 10% contingency, test prints and some packaging materials. I made sure to include both the final Kickstarter fee (5% of the total) and per pledge fees that cover payment processing (3% + £0.20 for pledges of £10 and over, 5% + £0.05 for pledges under £10).

I also set up the budget and goal with the worst case scenario assumption of every single pledge being from an international backer at the print tier. The reason for this is that these backers have the highest per pledge costs, primarily due to the shipping. So the budget was set up to ensure that it would break even in this worst case scenario. Every UK or PDF only backer I got increased the final ‘profit’ margin (see below for why this is in quotes).

The two biggest costs using this model were the fixed costs and shipping. The shipping costs covered postage and a supplement to the packaging materials budget. The fixed portion of the packaging materials ensured I could purchase a bulk pack of envelopes while the per pledge supplement ensured I could then scale up if necessary.

You’ll notice that the “Personal earnings” section of that chart is non-existent, or in other words it does not make a profit. There is a lot of discussion amongst the indie RPG scene about paying people fairly, including yourself, but by the point Project Cassandra got to Kickstarter I had already invested a significant amount of time into the game and it was going to be released regardless. The Kickstarter was there to push it over the line and provide the funds to both pay for an editor and an initial print run. If I had just released the game online I can guarantee that it would have failed to achieve enough sales to fund either of those and I still wouldn’t be getting paid for the work that went in.

The budget was set up so that once we’d hit the initial goal I would start earning a share of the pie, to the point that the final post-fulfilment spending looks like this:

As you can see “Personal earnings” in that chart, which accounts for ~£650, is actually a significant chunk of the final total. But that doesn’t really tell the whole story. Amongst indie developers there’s a push to pay a writing rate of 10 cents per word, which equates to ~7.5p (GBP) per word right now. Paying myself at that rate would account for ~90% of my personal earnings.

Which seems OK, until you add in all the design work, playtesting, sourcing and editing art, layout, packing orders for shipping and admin that I did. The only reason I “made money” on this was because I did all of that myself, I couldn’t realistically pay someone a fair rate to do it and still compensate myself in any way. I was also fortunate that I was able to use stock art, hiring an artist at standard rates could have easily blown through everything I earned from the campaign.

The second biggest chunk of that pie chart is shipping. I expected this, budgeted for it, included a buffer and thankfully came in slightly under my original estimate. Even then it was a significant proportion of the budget and we’re only talking about a zine here. I don’t want to imagine how expensive a 200-300 page, standard sized hardback rulebook costs to ship and if I ever get to the point of producing one I will definitely look into professional distribution or print on demand.

Being under budget on the final shipping helped offset a cost that I hadn’t originally factored in – purchasing a second hand label printer (which I’ve added under the supplies slice). I bought one after seeing them being discussed by other ZineQuesters and had originally expected to take the cost of it fully from my personal earnings. I can say without a doubt that it has been worth every penny. The amount of time and hassle it has saved is enormous and I fully recommend investing in one if you plan to run even a small Kickstarter. The Zebra GK420d I picked up typically sells for £120-150 second hand on eBay.

Lessons learned

Those are some of the raw numbers but how do I feel about the whole thing? Honestly, pretty good. With 175 backers in total the scale of the project was more successful than I’d expected but still manageable. I know a lot of people find running a Kickstarter can be overwhelming but personally that wasn’t the case here. I think I can attribute that to 3 factors.

  1. I started planning early. As I have mentioned previously I started investigating the feasibility of running the Kickstarter in November just to get a feel for what was possible. That included familiarising myself with the Kickstarter back-end, creating a test project and putting together basic budgets. Plural. I tried out a number of permutations before I settled on the one I used.
  2. 80% of the game was written prior to launch. That was mostly just a quirk of how long this game has been in development limbo but it helped with allowing me to show off a preview (including a full quickstart) explaining what the game was about and ordering test prints of the layout.
  3. I kept the campaign simple. Of all the stretch goals only the final mission trilogy added any extra work to the campaign. Adding colour printing increased the cost of each copy but not the workload as the PDF was always going to be in colour. Similarly unlocking What’s so [redacted] about [redacted]? to make it a PWYW product may, in the long run, cost me a small number of sales but it didn’t require any additional work or spending.

The things that I would definitely do differently are relatively minor. The first is a slightly heavier paper weight for the cover. As printed the cover works well, especially as I went for lamination but a denser paper would have added that little bit more stability and strength so it’s something I’ll keep in mind if I get to the point of needing a second print run.

The second is to rethink my approach to a special edition. Like many ZineQuesters I included a limited number tier for those wanting a copy of the game with some unique alterations. Keeping with the theme of the game I thought why not offer a redacted version, where I had gone through and blocked out sections of the text to the point that the game was unplayable.

I thought it would be a nice nod to the genre and it was fun to be paid to deface copies of the game. It was also incredibly time consuming. While I only had a dozen copies to redact doing it by hand was a far slower process than I originally anticipated and it contributed to a delay in sending out the final batch of zines.

Finally I’d make a slight adjustment to the design of my budget with regards the contingency funds. While I had included this in the initial budget at 10% of the goal I made it a fixed cost. So that £40 was going to be £40 regardless of how successful the project was. I got away with it this time but going forward I’ll be ensuring it scales with the campaign total.

ZineQuest 4?

I’ve already started thinking about ZineQuest 4, not so much in terms of content but logistics and planning. I think this campaign worked well so I wouldn’t change too much. If I run one next year my aim is to once again have as much as possible in place by the end of December. That will include bringing people on board earlier – an editor (probably Emzy if she is available) at a minimum but ideally an artist as well. That will obviously raise the campaign goal but for the direction I’m leaning towards stock art isn’t likely to be an option. My hope is that my sales this year will be sufficient to offset some of those costs and allow me to launch the Kickstarter with at least one showcase piece.

Obviously, unlike Project Cassandra, this won’t be a game that I’ve been working on for years which means I need to get it outlined and workshopped ASAP. Having seen the range of games on offer this year I think that I will aim for a less traditional system that embraces more indie concepts. Partially because I want to explore that space but also because the indie approaches I enjoy the most tend towards lighter systems with less mechanical crunch. I think Project Cassandra was about as crunchy as I’d be comfortable with given the constraints of the format.

One of the things that I need to change from this time round is promotion. While Project Cassandra reached more people than I ever expected I’m also not under the illusion that it was all (or even primarily) down to what I did. ZineQuest is one of those force multiplier events that allowed me to reach a lot more people than I normally could and I’ve no doubts that without its community I would have struggled to reach even the initial £400 goal.

That said I think with the proper promotion a future project could do even better but it is going to require work. Self promotion and networking is an area that I find excruciatingly difficult, both in gaming and my professional life as an academic. It’s also an essential aspect of this publishing gig – unless you manage to accidentally go viral with a new game it’s hard to get noticed unless you have an established following. I’m also extremely clear that this is an area where a) I’m going to have to push myself to consistently engage with more people and b) I’m in the privileged position that I can afford to fail. I’m doing this as a hobby and while I can day dream of one day making it a major part of my income I know how unlikely that is.

So what am I going to do about it? First up try and just put myself out there, primarily on twitter and to join conversations (while also being careful not to push myself into them when I’m not wanted). I’m also going to do my best to convert as many backers of this campaign as possible to being fans of my work. This is one of the reasons why I’ve started the LunarShadow Designs Newsletter, as an attempt to build awareness of my work and that of other indie creators. It’s slow going but I’ve made those first few steps. Once in person conventions return I’m going to do my best to attend as many as feasible, including looking into a stall at smaller events just to be seen.

The other important thing is to continue to release new material. I’m never going to be one of those designers that is constantly releasing games or supplements week after week but I’ve got a number of unfinished products in the pipeline. I’m slowly building up a portfolio that showcases what I am capable of and I think Project Cassandra is an excellent example of that but it’s only a start and I can’t wait to see where it takes me next.

Project Cassandra: Now on Kickstarter

The last few weeks have been exceedingly hectic with regards life in general but gaming in particular. Why? In short the Project Cassandra kickstarter launched on Feb 20th as part of ZineQuest 3 and while I’ve been heavily promoting it I somehow forgot to post about it on my own blog! Quite an oversight so I thought I’d drop a quick post now.

The campaign runs until the 6th March and has already exceeded my expectations – We’re over 200% funded as I write this with a week and a half left to run. We’ve unlocked the full colour printing stretch goal and I’m hopeful that we’ll hit at least one of the two remaining stretch goals. I’ve also been fortunate to be a guest on both the Yes Indie’d Podcast and the Effekt Podcast (the latter of which was streamed to youtube) so check those out for more details about the game.

State of the Conspiracy: Playtest Packet 2 Released

During the last few weeks I’ve been working towards a fairly major milestone in the development of Project Cassandra – the completion and release of a second playtest packet for the game which is now available as a free download via itch.io.

Playtest Packet 1 featured a minimal rules set, a single mission and pre-generated characters. Everything was there from a technical point of view but for anybody other than myself it would have been a stretch to run the game in the way I have always intended. This new release improves on the prior one in almost every way. The rules have been placed into context with explanatory text while new explanatory text sets the game and how to play in context. Crucially this includes additional detail on the central role of precognition to the game, from the opening questions during setup through to the use of premonitions during play.

Project Cassandra – draft cover page

Framing all of these changes is a test layout that I have been working on since purchasing Affinity Publisher earlier this year. While there are still tweaks to be made it looks great and helps immensely in setting the tone of the document. I’m hoping that in the coming months I’ll be able to use it for some test printings, both to test out a couple of zine options and to show it off in the run-up to the kickstarter.

Yes, kickstarter. Specifically ZineQuest 2021.

I’ve been considering the possibility since this years ZineQuest as the format is an ideal match for Project Cassandra, which I have always envisaged as fitting a small booklet form. It would also allow me to bring an editor, and possibly some writers, on board. That gives me five months to complete development and more importantly spread the word about the game so if you download the playtest packet I would greatly appreciate any comments or shout outs about the game. As a tiny indie designer it can often feel like I am shouting into the void when it comes to my work so any boosts are greatly appreciated.

Playtest Packet 2 is available for download from: https://lunarshadow.itch.io/project-cassandra

Example of play with layout

Kickstarter: Modern, Mythos and Machine Stock Art by JEShields

Disclaimer: James reached out to me directly in advance of his project going live and asked if I would be willing to share my thoughts about it when it went live. He provided the sample artwork used in this piece and a pre-launch preview of the campaign.

If you’re operating on the smaller end of the publishing scale like I am then one of the things you quickly learn is that artwork is expensive (and rightly so given the work that is involved). It’s why I use stock and royalty free artwork as much as possible. Amongst the artists producing stock art specifically for RPGs the one that I have turned to repeatedly is J. E. Shields, thanks to his consistent style and extensive catalogue across a range of genres.

His latest Kickstarter has just launched and is focused on 3 genres where stock art is often limited to come by – modern, the Cthulhu mythos and science fiction. Each genre will receive a mix of art covering full page/cover art, vehicles, half-page scenes, effects, characters and items. While the artwork will initially be black and white line art the stretch goals will cover upgrading the artwork to full colour.

This is very much a project to fill the gaps in the market, driven by discussion with small publishers and one that is definitely needed as just like gaming itself the majority of stock art out there covers D&D flavoured fantasy. The pledge levels start at $30, for which you’ll get access to a selection of the material while higher levels will net you all of the material produced for an individual genre or even all of the art that comes out of the project.

At $30 entry it represents tremendous value as this is typically the minimum you should expect to pay for a single piece of custom art. Backers will be able to submit illustration ideas to the project, while this won’t provide the control that an independent commission would include it does mean that you’ll get at least a couple of pieces that are influenced by your individual needs.

The Kickstarter has a goal of $4,900 and runs until the 23rd June. At the time of writing (on the day of launch) it was already 27% funded. You can also find James’ existing stock art catalogue on drivethruRPG (link includes the LunarShadow affiliate ID). Also, if you’re wondering about the value of the colour stretch goals I think this preview (left) speaks for itself.

State of the Conspiracy: Lockdown Update 1

So it’s mid May which equates to week 7 or 8 since the start of lockdown for me here in the UK. It sucks and having been through a similar process when writing my thesis many years ago meant I had an inkling of just how much it would sap my creative energy. Which is why I decided I wasn’t going to make any big goals about pushing Project Cassandra forward, even though it was next on my list after the release of Mission Packet 1: N.E.O., my mini supplement for The Sprawl RPG.

That’s not to say that I’ve made no progress. Following the play tests at BurritoCon and Dragonmeet I have been slowly working my way through the text, filling gaps and preparing for the dreaded rewrites. Given they’re likely to be extensive I decided the first step was to clarify my contents, which are currently:

Teaser / Blurb
Introduction
Defining the scenario
    Setup / Questions
    Pacing
    Sample questions
    Alternative setup
Agendas
    Make events extraordinary
    Build towards a dramatic climax
    Take suspicion and twist it towards paranoia
    Play to the era
    A note on historical accuracy
Safety tools
    Lines & Veils
    Script change
The Vision
Rules of Engagement
    Taking actions
        Aiding
    Premonitions
    Conditions & consequences
    Visions
    Powers
    Knowledges
    Gear
Enacting the Conspiracy
    Building the conspiracy
    Genre and tone
    Following the action
    Challenges & The Opposition
    Nulls
Example of Play
Creating characters
Sample Characters
    Secret service agent
Small time criminal
    Academic analyst
    Reporter
Two Minutes to Midnight
    Ich bin ein Berliner
    The dark of the moon

On the face of it that feel like a lot but many of those smaller sections come out to a single paragraph and my aim is to keep the finished product to within the limits of a zine.

Why?

Because I’d like to participate in ZineQuest 3 on Kickstarter next year. Having followed it the last couple of years it seems like the ideal way to launch Project Cassandra and actually produce physical copies. It would also provide the potential for something I just can’t afford right now – an editor. It’s part of the process that I really don’t get on with and where I know the game would benefit from a fresh set of eyes.

So alongside writing I’ve been slowly putting together a budget and trying to estimate the various costs. That, in and of itself, is a rabbit hole and I’m quickly discovering how much I don’t know, so I’m glad that I made this decision with enough time to just learn.

Thankfully I’ve got plenty of time to do that, so fingers cross next February I’ll be able to include Project Cassandra amongst the list of successfully funded ZineQuest Kickstarters.

First look: Crystal Heart setting book for Savage Worlds (print edition)

Disclaimer: I wrote one of the stretch goal adventures for the Crystal Heart Kickstarter and had access to the draft material for the main book prior to publication. I purchased the print edition as a regular backer to the Kickstarter using my own money.

While the Kickstarter for Crystal Heart by Up to Four Players has already completed delivery of the PDF of the setting book and most of the stretch goals (as I write this I’ve just received an email with yet another PDF – printable character minis!) I’ve been eagerly awaiting delivery of the physical book. I got home from work yesterday to find it waiting for me and I have to say that it is absolutely gorgeous. 216 pages, full colour, amazingness that cover everything you’d need to run a game in the world. How to create Agents of Syn, using Crystals, the five lands that comprise the known world. This is a seriously impressive and detailed book at every level.

I’m going to hold off on a review until I get a chance to run a few sessions with my current group so for now here’s just a few pictures to whet your appetite. If you missed out on the Kickstarter you can buy the PDF on drivethruRPG while physical copies should (I believe) be coming to retail soon. Eran and Aviv will also be at Dragonmeet next week (30th November 2019) and will have the book on show there (Edit: Looks like they will have it for sale at the convention).

Disclaimer: Links to driveThruRPG include the LunarShadow Designs affiliate ID. If you chose to purchase anything using these links I will earn a small commission from driveThruRPG at no cost to you.

Kickstarter: JourneyQuest Season 4

JourneyQuest, the ongoing and award winning fantasy series from Zombie Orpheus Entertainment (ZOE) is back… or at least it will be if its kickstarter for Season 4 is successful. The show follows the exploits of a dysfunctional adventuring party, drawn together by destiny and fated to change the shape of the world, even if they’d rather not. During the course of the first three seasons JourneyQuest has developed not only its protagonists but the world of Fatherall and its Fourth Age into a fully realised setting that rivals the likes of Middle Earth or Westeros.

But what’s special about JourneyQuest? Well have you heard of The Gamers, perhaps the most famous creation from the combined genius of Dead Gentlemen Productions and ZOE? The Gamers is a love letter to the gaming hobby as a whole, focusing on players and the frequently absurd hijinks that they get their characters into. The Gamers is where you find a thief turned lawyer obsessed with stealing trousers, a bard that dies a dozen times a session or a monk that spouts such wisdom as:

He who stumbles around in darkness with a stick is blind. But he who… sticks out in darkness… is… fluorescent!

Brother Silence, The Gamers: Dorkness Rising

Where The Gamers is about celebrating the hobby JourneyQuest is the epic saga celebrating the fantasy genre itself. It’s everything that the many failed D&D movies should have been. A consistent fantasy world that exists beyond the current scene, with a sense of both history and future and that manages to portray a serious story without sacrificing its sense of humour. It’s a show that deserves to be hailed far and wide not only for its world and storytelling but for demonstrating what independent creators are capable of when they push for excellence every step of the way.

Having crossed the half-way mark with Season 3 the remaining two seasons of JourneyQuest promise to up the ante as the tales of Perf, Nara, Carrow, Glorion, Wren and Rilk come to a head. This is a series that derserves to be finished and ZOE can’t do that without a successful. The show is, and always will be, in the hands of the people that fund it – the fans. While it is available for streaming via Amazon Prime, YouTube and The Fantasy Network it remains a Fan supported, Creator distributed production. That means there are no network executives or external distributors deciding on its fate. There are just regular people, like you and me.

So if you’re still not sure or you’ve missed the first three seasons then go watch it for free on The Fantasy Network before checking out the Kickstarter video below:

Demon Hunters: An Interview… with me!

The Demon Hunters World-bible and script Kickstarter is coming to a close, with a little over 2 days left to reach its goal. The campaign is ~$1000 away from funding at the moment so I wanted to talk a little about why I think you should back it. The below is an edited transcript from a short interview that I did about my involvement with the franchise as a signatory of the shared cinematic license.

• How did you come to the Demon Hunters universe?

I came to Demon Hunters by accident through the original RPG – I was a fan of the Cortex system and when I heard there was a new setting coming out for it I asked my FLGS to order a copy in. I knew virtually nothing about the world, beyond the fact it was supernatural comedy but from the moment I opened it up I was hooked.

• What is it about Demon Hunters that you like the most? Why?

The element that has always drawn me into the world of Demon Hunters is the humour. Demon Hunters took the urban fantasy genre and applied a dry satire to it in the way that only Dead Gentlemen Productions knows how. It’s there in the original movies and by the time the RPG came out it had been honed to perfection and expanded to cover an entire world history. So many of the concepts are absurd when you look at them but the setting puts such a straight face on them that you wonder how they haven’t always been staples of the genre.

• Do you have a favourite memory related to Demon Hunters? If so what is it?

Just one? Thanks to some amazing players over the years I could go on for hours. If I did have to pick then I think it would have to be the first time I ran the adventure that would go on to become Channel Surfing – at the end of the first session one of the players, who was brand new to RPGs turned to me and told me that I had managed to properly unnerve them as they investigated an abandoned apartment – little did any of us know that by the end of the next session she would be embraced by the puppet incarnation of Count Dracula. I can’t think of anywhere else where that chain of events would make sense, let alone be a dramatic high of the campaign.

• What kinds of things do you hope to see come out of the shared cinematic license? Are there stories you might like to tell?

I’m already a signatory of the shared cinematic license and have been putting it to use releasing adventure starters. Right now I’m still working on the remainder of the Slice of Life releases that I pledged to produce as part of that Kickstarter but after that, I have a number of plans. I have multiple Warehouse adventures to adapt to the current canon but the big one I have plans for is an adventure I’m loosely calling Rocket Demons of Antiquity, spanning both the Victorian and Modern eras and utilising an off the books, historical team led by Mina Harker. It’s just a concept and it’ll be a while before it even enters playtesting.

As for what else I would like to see? More, more of everything. The world bible hints at so much that I would love to see people fill in the gaps and expand on what is really going on. Is the Cypher collective evolving into something new and terrifying? What truth lurks beneath the Bermuda Triangle? And most importantly of all why a Yak?

• If you were in the DH universe, what would you be? (hunter, creature, etc)

Well, I’m a research scientist so a member of Mwhahaha would make sense but let’s be realistic – like most of us, I’d be that normal that stumbles into something that they can’t make sense off and either runs off screaming or gets eaten just as the team show up to save the day.

• What do you want to see happen in Demon Hunters 3?

I think everybody wants to know what happened to Gabriel and Chris. Are they in Hell? Are they somewhere in between? Also just what has happened to the Brotherhood during all this time? Is there a new Alpha One? Did Ichabod’s treachery get revealed or did the events of Dead Camper Lake get quietly swept under the rug?

• Why should backers care about Demon Hunters? What is it that makes it cool or fun? In other words, what is the Demon Hunters universe at its best, or what does it do best? What stories does it tell the best?

It’s Dead Gentlemen Productions at their best. Demon Hunters was where it all started and you can see how those first two movies have influenced the approaches of everything that came later. That was 20 years ago and the team have gone from students working it out as they go along to producing professional level material that is pushing the boundaries of small, independently produced productions. Just imagine what they could do with the series if they put all that experience behind it? The Slice of Life mini-series gave us a taste but a full movie could push it so much further.

So go take a look at the Kickstarter and if you can back it. Together we can renew Demon Hunters.

Final Push: Strowlers – Three New Stories

Strowlers is the latest and most ambitious project from Zombie Orpheus Entertainment (ZOE). In a world much like ours, but where magic exists and is regulated as strictly as plutonium, the Strowlers believe that magic is for everyone. Now, from the fringes of society, they’re creating global communities of mutual support with the goal of building a better world. The initial offering from the series has been well-received thanks to its storytelling, production values and incorporation of diverse viewpoints. This is a series that aims to tell the stories that are all too often left behind.

And it needs your help.

Like all of ZOEs shows the series is fan supported and distributed directly by the creators. The Kickstarter for the latest offering of three new stories (an interlude short film, a full episode and a novel) is, unfortunately, struggling. With 7 days to go, it is $14,000 / £10,000 short of funding its relatively modest goal (given the scope and professional production values) of $26,000. It’s a story that deserves to continue so if you’re interested or on the fence then consider pledging, you’ll only be charged if the campaign succeeds so there is no need to wait and see if it does. Every pledge, even for a single dollar, helps.

If you’re new to Strowlers and want to know more then you’re in luck – the series is available to stream from multiple platforms. For those with Amazon Prime subscriptions you can stream it from here (US link) or from here (UK link). Don’t subscribe to Amazon Prime? Then you’re in luck, as the series is available to stream for free from The Fantasy Network, ZOEs digital distribution platform.

The Kickstarter runs until Saturday 16th March and can be backed by following this link.

Demon Hunters: Worldbible and Script Kickstarter

With the final stretch goals for the Demon Hunters: A Comedy of Terrors RPG released the minds at Dead Gentlemen Productions have turned to the future of the franchise with their latest Kickstarter – a print edition of the settings world bible and a script for the as yet untitled Demon Hunters 3. The Kickstarter aims to bring together all the threads of a world 20 years in the making and finally tie off the story of Chris, Gabriel and Duamerthrax the Indestructible.

Anybody reading this will know that I’m a massive fan of the setting but why should somebody who doesn’t know the universe be interested? Firstly, the aim is to make it more accessible to new audiences. The original movies are bad. I love them but there is no other way to put it. They were the first productions from a group of students who barely knew what they were doing. Despite that the potential is apparent. The raw genius that would go on to define Dead Gentlemen Productions and Zombie Orpheus Entertainment is all there. Its given rise to The Gamers, JourneyQuest and Strowlers. All of which have benefitted from the professional production values that the teams have learned since those early movies. This is a chance to put all that experience towards the franchise that started it.

Second? It opens the world up. The previous Kickstarter for the Slice of Life web series resulted in Demon Hunters adopting a Shared Cinematic Universe license. At its core that license allows fans to produce and release their own material. It’s the license that I use for all of my adventure starters but it can just as easily be applied to books, web shows, comics etc. There’s even a route for having your own creations be incorporated into the canon.

Finally, Demon Hunters is Dead Gentlemen Productions at their best. It’s dry satire that walks that fine line between plausibility and absurdity. It shouldn’t work, yet it does and it deserves to be seen by more people. This Kickstarter will help make that happen.

The Kickstarter has until March 30th to reach its goal of $13,600. It is currently sitting at $6,146 with 24 days to go. Back it at https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/deadgentlemen/demon-hunters-world-bible-and-film-script

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