RPGaDay 2021: 12th August

It’s time, once again for RPGaDay and as always I’ll be releasing a short post each day inspired by the prompt from the table below. For the most part these are going to be off the top of my head, zero edit posts so I have no idea how much sense they’ll make or where each prompt will take me.

12th August: Think

I’ve been doing a lot of thinking recently about publishing, what I want to get out of it and the intersection between hobby and business. Over the last year or so I’ve shifted towards releasing things that have a price tag affixed to them. The result of that is that very few people actually end up seeing my games – Signal to Noise released a week and a half ago and so far has racked up all of 8 sales. I’d obviously like that number to be higher but on the other hand I put a lot of work into the game and would like to see some earnings back from it.

Which, I suppose, brings me to the point of this and what I’ve been thinking about recently. This is a hobby for me, so should I even be bothered about price and earnings? You could make the argument that no, I don’t need to and I should consider just putting everything out for free or PWYW. The counter to that is that this risks devaluing the work that people doing it for a job do. How do you fairly price something when a hobbyist working in their spare time for fun can produce material close to or at the level that a professional working in the industry can do? It’s a conundrum and not an easy one to answer. I firmly believe that an individual should be able to make a living from making RPGs and actively want a wider more diverse selection of people who are able to do so. That can only make the industry stronger. I don’t think it will ever be an easy task, there are so few companies that hire people that the majority of designers are always going to be freelancers/self-employed while selling enough to make a living off of games requires an investment of either time or money – both of which I realise are privileges many people don’t have access to.

On the other hand how do you balance that when there are people like me who can do it for fun, don’t need to make an earning from it but can? As a hobbyist should I be expected to price my material at the same level as a professional working full time? Should I give it away for free? Is there a middle ground that doesn’t undercut the industry as a whole but reflects the intersection of the two? I just don’t know and I think the short form discussion that platforms such as twitter encourage really prevents us from having a proper, nuanced discussion about it.

The other issue that I think doesn’t help is the move towards digital. On one hand I think it’s great, as it opens up the door for people that just can’t afford a print run and games that don’t suit traditional formats. As a society though I think we still don’t appreciate the value of digital goods. The time and work that goes into a game is rarely focused on what it takes to get it printed and from what I’ve learned the actual cost to print most games reflects only 10% or less of the cover price. The rest goes into the art, the writing, the time it took to design and playtest. All factors that play into PDFs as much as print yet we value that printed book far more than the file sat on our computers and until we get past that I don’t think we’re ever going to value small games by indie designers properly.

What’s on my shelf 3: The Indie Corner

Next up in exploring my physical collection I’ve got the indie corner and at first glance it’s a little underwhelming. Not because of the games that are present but because the vast majority of my indie collection is digital. It’s one of the things I’d like to amend going forward, especially once we get back to in person conventions and I can buy directly from the creators.

So what’s present? The first call out, over on the very right, is Crystal Heart from Up to Four Players. It’s an amazing setting for the Savage Worlds system and I was lucky enough to write one of the stretch goal adventures, Ghosts of Iron. It was my first (and currently only) time working as a freelancer and something I’m keen to do more of once I whittle down my own project list.

There are a smattering of PbtA and Fate books, both systems that I enjoy but haven’t latched onto the way the wider market has. I used to own more but have sold off bits here and there over the last few years. Surprisingly I only acquired a print copy of The Sprawl after releasing The Synth Convergence at the end of 2019. The most recent acquisition is Black Armada’s Last Fleet, which is essentially Battlestar Galactica with the serial numbers filed off. Despite loving the concept and genre I’ve yet to get around to reading it.

Dotted amongst those is a rather eclectic selection, a number of which came out of the Scottish indie scene between 2008-2011. I was fortunate to know and mix with a number of the designers that were around Glasgow and Edinburgh at that point and without it I doubt I’d have gotten in to indie gaming to the extent that I have. From that period Remember Tomorrow remains one of my go to references for Gibson flavoured cyberpunk and goes nicely with The Sprawl and Technoir. Unfortunately somewhere along the way I lost my treasured fold out copy of Hell 4 Leather. It’s a game that I love and was my first real introduction to narrative, GMless gaming.

The thing that I’ve really come to appreciate with indie games, and even more so with those I own digitally, is the sheer range of systems and the stories they tell. With ZineQuest having only recently finished I’m looking forward to seeing what the latest round of games from new designers look like and adding them to the shelf.

For those that might be wondering the full list of games in the photo is as follows:

  • Last Fleet
  • The Cthulhu Hack (and Mother’s Love adventure supplement)
  • Technoir
  • 2 copies of BESM 2nd edition
  • Remember Tomorrow
  • Goblin Quest
  • Piledrivers and Powerbombs
  • Fate Accelerated
  • Fate System Toolkit
  • Fate Core
  • Scum & Villainy
  • The Sprawl
  • Dungeon World
  • Crystal Heart
  • 3:16 Carnage Amongst the Stars
  • Best Friends

New Release: Mission Packet 2 Subversion

The Sprawl is built around missions and the Corporations have no shortage of dirty money but if you want to take the fight to them that means subverting their goals, one directive at a time. Mission Packet 2: Subversion introduces three new, non-Corporate factions struggling to fight against the system, custom moves for subverting the goals of the Corporations and missions for each faction for once you have earned their trust. The Factions introduced in this Mission Packet are:

  • The Synth Republic, who seek to rescue captured AI from the hands of their Corporate masters and provide them the opportunity to experience life in the physical domain. 
  • The Peoples Union, local gang or the last protectors of labour rights? When they offer you the chance to wipe the debt of thousands of workers from the system will you step up to protect the downtrodden?
  • The Env, anti-capitalist environmental activists pushed to take extreme measures in their fight to protect what little is left of the natural world.

Mission Packet 2: Subversion is available now from itch.io and drivethruRPG (includes affiliate link) for $1.50. This release requires a copy of The Sprawl RPG to play.

#RPGaDay2019 21th August: ‘Vast’

August has come around once again which means it’s time for RPGaDay 2019. In a shift from the questions format of previous years this year is characterised by a series of prompts, which I’ll be attempting to answer each day with a short post, with the prompt word highlighted in bold each day.

Day 21: Vast

Despite playing a wide variety of systems I’m extremely aware that there are vast sections of the hobby that I have had minimal interaction with. If I created a venn diagram of overlapping spheres of influence my main intersection would be with “traditional non-D&D” then much smaller overlaps with D&D and indie games with a final tiny overlap with OSR and story games. There is just so much out there that I can’t understand how people can stick to just one or even one type of game. I’d happily play or run a different system every day if I could and I’d still only skim the surface of what was out there.

#RPGaDay2019 8th August: ‘Obscure’

August has come around once again which means it’s time for RPGaDay 2019. In a shift from the questions format of previous years this year is characterised by a series of prompts, which I’ll be attempting to answer each day with a short post, with the prompt word highlighted in bold each day.

Day 8: Obscure

With the explosion of self-publishing, story games and indie RPGs it’s difficult to define what an obscure RPG is these days. In the technical sense the majority are as, unsurprisingly, all too many fall by the wayside. I don’t get to play as many small, less well known games these days (I don’t get to play all that many well known games either!) but if I were wanting to get back into that side of gaming I’d probably do so via The Gauntlet, who embrace small games through both their Codex magazine and their highly organised online games calendar. I briefly subscribed to Codex via the Patreon and would recommend it to anybody wanting to explore games that really push the boundaries of the hobby (I stopped only because it was clear that the games weren’t what I was looking for right now). Head over to gauntlet-rpg.com to find the blog, community forums and more details or to www.patreon.com/gauntlet to subscribe.

State of the Conspiracy: Character update

While I was unable to get a full update of Project Cassandra finished in time for the RPG Live UK event I was able to make significant progress. The character sheets have been updated to reflect the rules changes and I’ve identified all the edits required in the main text. Next up is getting them down on paper and adjusting the layout to suit.

Changing the text should also allow for a few additions. First up is a mechanic to allow for premonitions to be replenished, something raised during that disastrous DragonMeet playtest. Secondly additional advice for challenges and threats, again in response to the playtest feedback.

I’m hopeful that this set of edits will resolve the issues raised, especially with regards failure. I don’t know if I’ll make it to DragonMeet this year but I’m setting it as a tentative deadline regardless.

RPGaDay 20th and 21st August

Double post before I fall even more behind and because two days is the most dramatically appropriate number of posts to catch-up on.

20th) What is the best source for out-of-print RPGs?

For me it’s a mix of eBay and drivethruRPG depending on whether I want to own physical books or not. I’ve drifted over to the not camp for games I’m just interested in if only because of the space saving or because it’s splat book 21 of a given system and really I only need it to reference a single page.

In terms of the single best out of print purchase I’ve had it was from an Oxfam bookshop. Somebody had obviously been clearing out their shelves and had donated a massive pile of WEG Star Wars d6 books. I ended up buying almost all of them, spent close to £100 on them which is probably the single biggest book purchase I’ve ever made.

21st) Which RPG does the most with the least words?

A difficult question but I think that I’m going to go with Hell 4 Leather. The rules fit on a double sided fold out (around A3 size) but manage to be both evocative and detailed enough to outline the entire story arc. The game is designed for single story play but because of the way scenes are described it has tremendous replay value.

The game isn’t known nearly as well as it deserves but I highly recommend picking it up: Hell 4 Leather on DriveThruRPG

RPGaDay August 17th

17th) Which RPG have you owned the longest but not played?

bf_thumb600Probably some of the really niche indie games such as Best Friends by Gregor Hutton, Cold City from Contested Ground Studios or Piledrivers and Powerbombs by Prince of Darkness Games. There was a vibrant Scottish small press community during the time I lived in Glasgow so I was able to pick up a lot of games I’d otherwise never have encountered.

I like reading RPGs as much as playing them so I do tend to pick up a lot of small things here and there without necessarily expecting to ever run / play them. The downside is, as always, time. I’ve got a lot of great games that I’d love to play and even more ok games that I’d just like to give a spin. There’s always something new and with the tendency for most players to prefer campaigns it can be difficult to find people to give them a try, especially given the onus on the GM having to teach the systems.