The Fallen Mountains – Rough Map

One of the things I’ve always had in my head for the Fallen Mountains setting is the geography of the region but getting it down on paper has always been a stumbling block. An upcoming short campaign in the setting has provided new impetus to put something together, produced using the InKarnate web software. I’m still not 100% happy with the outcome. Hopefully with some more practise I can replace it with a hand drawn version but I still struggle with too many of the details I want to add.

fallen-mountains-draft2

Adventure Logs: Mind Maps

One of the things that I’m particularly bad at when it comes to managing campaigns is actually writing things up in coherent blocks of text. Partially that’s down to the way I tend to make notes, haphazard and on the fly but it’s also because I’m not that great at concise writing or writing in general (one of the purposes of this blog is to provide me with practise at doing so). This obviously impacts on how I keep track of what happens in a campaign and once I get past 3 or 4 sessions I often find that I’m left with multiple bits of paper containing all the random notes I’ve scribbled down during play. One of the ways I manage this is through Obsidian Portal, but most of the time my wiki’s end up lacking and I really make most use of the character side of the site, allowing me to keep all the PCs and NPCs in one place.

With all this in mind something I’m looking for other ways to record what is going on, which has been prompted by our current Dresden Files campaign. We’ve just started the final adventure of the trilogy we’d aimed for and as the GM I’m now trying to make sure everything connects together properly, especially the random elements from earlier adventures I’d introduced without knowing exactly how they fitted in (this is a big part of my GMing style, I’ll add something then adjust my existing idea of what’s going on to account for it). One of the best ways I’ve found to do that is through mind mapping, as I can just list out the elements and connect them together. Normally I do this in my trusty notebook but in the last few days I’ve started to look at web options for doing so, at the moment I’ve settled on using bubbl.us, so that my players can also see the results.

Dresden---Adventure-1_3l47eubsThe above is the resulting map from the first adventure. For an outsider it won’t explain anything that is going on but I hope that for the people involved it will serve as a good reference point to remind us of the connections and what happened during the adventure. The best bit of course is that between sessions I can simply add extra bubbles as ideas come together, or delete them if I change my mind.

I’m curious though, what other ways do people use to manage their campaigns? Or do you have any software you’d recommend for doing so?

Go Big or Go Achievable

When it comes to running campaigns I have to admit that for a long time I’ve had a problem when it comes to scale. Simply put as a GM I tend to think big and long term, with multi-part story arcs that will take dozens of sessions to complete. Part of that stems from my introduction to tabletop gaming, brand new to RPGs I joined a new Torg campaign run by an awesome GM. The campaign followed the official storyline that was published when the game first came out and while I only played in it for the first year it ran for over four years right up until the final confrontation with the Gaunt Man himself. When I left the game I did so to start GMing for the first time, with my first campaign returning to what I knew, the very Torg adventures I’d played in the year before. While that campaign did reach a conclusion it wasn’t the one I’d hoped for, though it was epic in nature.

Since then I can think of only a handful of campaigns which have wrapped up satisfactorily and of those that haven’t most have fallen apart after 6-10 sessions due to players conflicts. Almost every time those campaigns have fallen apart with little of the world and larger campaign revealed to the players. The most recent example of this is the Legends of the Five Rings campaign I was running, while the game had completed a short self contained adventure (the first part of which is detailed here) the adventure ended with the party learning only that the events had been orchestrated by an outside faction. They never learnt who or why and more importantly they never got the chance to stop them.

So with my current Dresden Files campaign I’m taking a different approach, that of Go Achievable and running it as a series of discrete adventures each for around 3 sessions in length. Most importantly I’m aiming to make each adventure almost entirely self contained, so should it fall apart there shouldn’t be dozens of hanging plot threads left. The most difficult bit though is trying to be concious of the pace of the game, knowing that I need to reach a conclusion within a short time period.

It’s a bit of a challenge at the moment but hopefully it’ll work out in the long run.

May’s RPG Blog Carnival: Campaign’s I’d like to run

  For May’s RPG blog carnival Age of Ravens asks: What campaign would you like to run? Like anybody who has spent more time behind the GM screen than in front of it I could point to a wide range of systems and settings that I’d like to run but campaigns, they’re a little trickier. To me asking what campaign I’d like to run goes beyond a simple multiple session adventure (or series of adventures), a campaign to me is something that envisages a long term game with an over arching theme from the start, antagonists with long term goals and NPCs / factions that have time to develop in response to the actions of the PCs.

So what campaigns would I like to run then? Well I’ve got 3 that immediately come to mind.

  1. Torggame-logo
    Torg by West End Games
    Torg served as my introduction to tabletop RPGs when I first moved to Glasgow in 2006 and after a year of playing in a great campaign I transferred from player to GM and it became the first campaign I ever ran. This one is therefore, a bit of a cheat, as I’ve already run the campaign once before. The thing is at the time I was a rookie, both to RPGs and even more so to GMing and as such I made mistakes. Truth be told I made a lot of mistakes. So that’s why I’d like to run the campaign again, to truly do justice to the epic campaign that was published for the game and that spans from the invasion of earth by multiple alternative dimensions all the way through to a world shattering conclusion.
  2. talesomega3
    Demon Hunters by Margaret Weiss Productions and Dead Gentlemen Productions
    This is another cheat answer in some respects as I regularly run games of Demon Hunters that, along with the games run by a couple of friends, comprise what we’ve termed a meta campaign, loosely collected together over on Obsidian Portal as Tales of the Omega. However what we’ve never done is draw it all together with a larger overarching plot or central villains, all the existing games are essentially independent of one another at present. This is in part because of the ad-hoc nature of the games at this point, having moved away from Glasgow I now only play Demon Hunters on the rare occasions when I’m both visiting and can get the right people together.
  3. corporation
    Corporation by Brutal Games
    To wrap up this post is the final campaign that I’d like to run, one that is completely free from any of my existing or previous games. Corporation is a cyberpunk / sci-fi game with a well established world setting. Much of which I’d like to ignore. Instead I’d like to focus more on a traditional cyberpunk angle, the emergence of AIs and the effect that increasing cyberisation has on the population as a whole. Now I’ll be the first to admit that this isn’t a new angle, truth be told such campaign themes are really what the original cyberpunk stories of Gibson et al were all about. But it’s not a campaign that I’ve run in the past and it is a genre that I wish I’d played more of. When, or even if, I’ll get to run it is something I don’t know but until then I can keep on dreaming of my electric sheep.

Kickstarter: Obsidian Portal Reforged

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If you’ve engaged with online tabletop gaming at all in the last few years then you’ve probably heard of Obsidian Portal, a campaign management site for RPGs. Based upon a wiki format the site makes it easy to track adventures, characters, items and events in your game for easy reference at a later date. Best of all the basic site is free, allowing a GM to create and manage two campaigns while the Ascendant (paid) accounts allow for more campaigns as well as providing additional options such as forums, custom CSS layouts and the option to add ‘player secrets’ which can be seen by only the GM and a single player.

The site is a great tool for games, but it could be better… a lot better. Those aren’t my words but those of the Obsidian Portal staff themselves, as posted on their recently launched Kickstarter. The goal of the project? To reforge the site with improvements to the core system, a new and improved page design and of course extra features that aren’t currently present (I’m hoping that will include some sort of Roll20 integration).

Their goal? $5000, which they blew through in the first day, so with most of the month to go it’s likely they’ll be hitting plenty of stretch goals. As the majority of the backer tiers are orientated around Ascendant upgrades the main stretch goal is focused on extensions to the Ascendant tier, at present everybody will be getting an extra month of free Ascendant time, with further months added for each additional $10000 raised over the initial goal (as I write they’re nearing the second month / $25000 mark).

The Kickstarter will be running until April 26th and can be found here.