#RPGaDay2019 4th August: ‘Share’

August has come around once again which means it’s time for RPGaDay 2019. In a shift from the questions format of previous years this year is characterised by a series of prompts, which I’ll be attempting to answer each day with a short post, with the prompt word highlighted in bold each day.

Day 4: Share

During the initial development of Project Cassandra I was posting material fairly regularly but then took it all down after the messy Dragonmeet playtest. I’m only now rectifying that error and starting to share it again. I should have left it all up but the more I put off working the problem the less I wanted it out there. So in the spirit developing in the open here are the current character sheets, two of which are brand new and were written for the recent BurritoCon in Manchester. Included with that is a small GM pack, covering a basic rules cheat-sheet, summary of each characters skills and the all important opening questions for ‘Ich bin ein Berliner’, the scenario I created specifically for the convention.

So here it is, the first playtest packet for the latest iteration of the game:

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#RPGaDay2019 3rd August: ‘Engage’

August has come around once again which means it’s time for RPGaDay 2019. In a shift from the questions format of previous years this year is characterised by a series of prompts, which I’ll be attempting to answer each day with a short post, with the prompt word highlighted in bold each day.

Day 3: Engage

I find it a real struggle to engage with the wider community, I am regularly one of those passive takers in of information. It is something that I find difficult both online and in the real world. Sometimes I feel like I’m just not opinionated enough but a large part of it is just down to being fairly introverted, I hate having to put myself into a conversation even on platforms such as twitter. It’s odd in that engagement is actually one of the aspect of actually gaming that I really appreciate, I can sit down at a small table with strangers and automatically have the shared focus of the game in common with them. Put me in that same group without a game and even if I knew that we were all gamers I would still struggle to socialise properly.

#RPGaDay2019 2nd August: ‘Unique’

August has come around once again which means it’s time for RPGaDay 2019. In a shift from the questions format of previous years this year is characterised by a series of prompts, which I’ll be attempting to answer each day with a short post, with the prompt word highlighted in bold each day.

Day 2: Unique

I think people put too much focus on being unique and shouting about how their game is revolutionary then get knocked back when it doesn’t transform the hobby. While I appreciate the need to sell our creations I think it is all too easy to look at the success stories and forget that for every ground-breaking game there were a hundred that never built any traction and another dozen that built only limited short-term interest. It might sound rather negative but I think my underlying point is that we don’t give enough focus to the small success stories or the good but not amazing products that are out there. I don’t know whether that’s a reflection of UK vs US approaches to success or the fact I’m just not forthright in general but it is something that I find difficult with, both from the perspective of selling myself and from the fact that I feel like too many people come across as pushy or arrogant.

#RPGaDay2019 1st August: ‘First’

August has come around once again which means it’s time for RPGaDay 2019. In a shift from the questions format of previous years this year is characterised by a series of prompts, which I’ll be attempting to answer each day with a short post, with the prompt word highlighted in bold each day.

Day 1: First

While my first tabletop RPG was Torg my first introduction to the wider hobby was actually larping. Nexus was a near-future system about outcasts living on the edge of Corporate Britain. I got into it completely by chance – The organiser wanted to use Airsoft for the combat system so reached out to one of the communities that I was a part of. Despite having access to a range of airsoft equipment I ended up creating a low combat medtech who promptly died during an ambush on the first day and was revived by a rare piece of technology that the Corporation were testing on the local population. While the system only lasted a few years during that time I was hooked, both the events and online activity between them scratched a creative itch I hadn’t realised existed. When I moved to Glasgow for my PhD I didn’t hesitate to join GUGS, the RPG society.

Con Report: BurritoCon 3

This weekend I had the pleasure of not only attending a new convention (to me) but getting to run the first public playtest of Project: Cassandra since reworking the system.

Held at Fanboy 3 in Manchester’s city centre the con is a small event, just over 20 attendees with 4 morning games and a further 4 in the afternoon. For the morning slot my first choice of A Code of Steam and Steel (run by creator Simon Burley, @squadronuk on twitter) sadly had too much interest so I moved to the my alternative choice of Marvel FASERIP game (run by (@ConvergenceUK1). It is a legendary system but not one I’d played before. I won’t spoil the scenario but our group of Captain America, Captain Britain, Daredevil, Spiderman and Union Jack succeeded in saving the day.

The FASERIP system is interesting but definitely a product of its time with the need to cross reference the dice roll against a chart. It works well though and flowed pretty effortlessly, thanks in part to the fact that the GM clearly knew it inside and out, I am fairly certain he could run it entirely in his head if he wanted. We unfortunately ran quite considerably past the end of the 3 hour slot, in part due to a series of bad rolls during the opening combat leading to our superheroes failing struggling to fight off mere rats. A little frustrating given I then had to rush to eat lunch before the next slot.

I’ve now played three different Marvel systems and while I’ve generally enjoyed them am coming to the conclusion that comic book style superhero games aren’t for me. They tend to jump from one action scene to another too much for my liking. It’s entirely consistent with the genre so the issue is definitely with me as opposed to the games but I find it interesting just how long it has taken for me to reach this point of understanding.

For the afternoon shot I was fortunate to be able to playtest the new and improved Project: Cassandra. I had four players who took on the roles of Tanaka, Whitford, Sarsin and Brown as they attempted to save JFK from assassination. I am really happy to say that the game not only went well but provided me with plenty of data for where to focus fine tuning. The characters worked, with their diverse skill sets forcing them to come together as a team and the changes to the skill system meant that they actually failed actions at what felt like the right frequency. They also managed to bypass the entire opening challenge (being chased through the countryside by East German patrols) after an impressive use of a Knowledge provided them with a glider for a stealth insertion. That’s exactly the sort of thing that Knowledges exist for and it was encouraging to see it work in play.

New and improved Project: Cassandra character sheets

In terms of fine tuning and changes there are certainly still tweaks that need to be made. Right now my thoughts are:

  • A set of four shared central skills, for example everybody should have observation under the mental skill set.
  • Clearer guidelines for harm, both taking and causing it. The combat we had was quick, as intended, but was over a little too quickly to build tension.
  • Ensure that the opening questions include at least one location the PCs need to reach before the President to give them a signpost for where to go.
  • One of the players actually suggested making premonitions work the way they used to (only reroll dice without successes). I do prefer this option but need to do a deep dive into the probabilities in order to make it work.
  • Guidelines for tailoring the scenarios to one-shots vs mini-campaigns.

That obviously looks like a lot of negatives but doesn’t really touch on all the things that worked and how happy I was with being able to play through a full scenario in just three hours. With a few other projects moving to completion recently Project: Cassandra is back in focus and I’m looking forward to start pulling it together again. First stop, a basic playtest packet that I can release and use in the future.

As a small and relatively local event I can say that I really enjoyed BurritoCon, everybody I spoke to was friendly, it was amazingly well organised by Neil of Old Scouser Roleplaying (@oldscouserRPing) and the games on offer were diverse with no overlapping systems. Of the eight systems played over the course of the day three were being run by their creators, a rather impressive ratio. Fanboy 3 is also a great venue, with plenty of space and one of the largest board game collections I’ve seen for sale outside of the Games Expo. Perhaps the only downside of the event was most people needing to disperse home relatively quickly afterwards, but that’s not too surprising when people have travelled on the day to be there.

There’s talk of a repeat in October and I can confidently say I’ll try and attend it given how much I enjoyed this visit.

Review: D&D Monster Cards 6-16 by Gale Force Nine

As my D&D campaign has progressed my players have slowly murdered encountered tougher and tougher opponents. It’s the way that D&D works, which meant that sooner or later I was going to want to field creatures with challenge ratings above 5. We’ve now reached that point, so it seems appropriate to review the second of Gale Force Nine’s Monster Card packs, which covers CR 6-16.

This slighly smaller pack provides 74 creatures, once again using a mix of regular and double width cards with images on the front and stats on the back. The majority are double width, which isn’t really surprising given the more complex rules associated with many of these creatures. As with the CR 0-5 pack the cards are of good quality and presented in a consistent, clear format that includes their special abilities. As a reference resource they work, though you’ll need to look up the details of any spells that are listed (which is understandable)

Unfortunately, as with the CR 0-5 pack (reviewed here) Gale Force Nine have chosen to omit a number of monsters, including some of the more iconic entries. You get, for example, all of the Young Dragons but not a single Adult Dragon. There’s also no Beholder but for some reason the CR 17 Dragon Turtle and Goristro are present (I don’t know if this is a mistake in my pack or not because GF9 don’t list the contents anywhere I could find). Apparently some of the omissions are because they didn’t want to include anything with a lair action, which I think is a rather ludicrous choice given the stated CR range.

All in all the pack is rather disappointing, while I will make use of the cards for quick reference the omissions compromise it too much for me to recommend it at the RRP of $16/£13. That goes double if you already have easy access to the Monster Manual.

All reviews are rated out of 10, with Natural 20s reserved for products that go above and beyond my expectations. Unless otherwise stated all review products have been purchased through normal retail channels.

New Release: Trick of the Light Adventure Starter

Recruitment drives. When you go through Agents at the rate the Brotherhood does they’re a necessary evil. Normally we’d send somebody from personnel but they’re on an away day. Again. So pack your bags, you’re off to Vegas and the Convention of Magical Americans. We need you to scout the show for any potential recruits, every year there’s at least one true student of the arcane arts mixed in amongst the stage magicians. Not that you should discount the illusionists, misdirection and sleight of hand are just as valuable in our line of work.

We’ve nabbed some press passes for you. Well, we told them you were influencers… whatever that means. So look the part and try not to go too viral, your health insurance doesn’t cover that.

Trick of the Light is an adventure starter for the Demon Hunters: A Comedy of Terrors RPG by Dead Gentlemen Productions. Inspired by the Demon Hunters: Slice of Life episode The Amazing Velma this adventure starter provides an open framework for GMs to adapt and run the adventure for their own groups. Can the Chapter find and recruit mystical talents without blowing their cover? Was the death of famous magician Griff McCarn really an accident and how on earth do we get Nicky to leave us alone?

Trick of the Light is available at drivethruRPG & Itchio as a Pay What You Want PDF download. Paid purchases, feedback or reviews are greatly appreciated and keep me motivated to produce more material.

Download it now from drivethruRPG or Itchio