Quick Review: Story Dice, The Game

I picked up Story Dice, The Game on a whim over Christmas in order to avoid paying delivery charges on a Christmas present. I had seen it advertised and thought that the blank ‘chalkboard’ dice would be a nice addition to games where I wished to introduce a customised roll. On opening the packaging though I could immediately tell that I was going to be disappointed.

Firstly, the box was basically empty – the entire contents could have been fitted into something much smaller. What were those contents? 3 icon d6 dice, 2 blank ‘chalkboard’ dice, a bag of small counters, a chalk pen and a sheet of paper with the instructions for the game. Instructions that were little more than draw/write something on the blank dice, roll all the dice, tell a short story using the icons, the best story gets a counter.

Now as a game goes simple is often the way forward. Unfortunately, the dice themselves do not lend themselves to fun stories. The icon dice are uninspiring and include rather mundane faces such as a mobile phone, a bathtub or a person in bed. In my opinion they’d have been much better with fantasy, sci-fi or action elements rather than generic everyday items. As for the ‘chalkboard’ dice that were the main reason I’d bought the game? Well turns out they were just slightly larger, blank plastic dice with rough edges where the two halves have been joined. There’s even a couple of points that I will probably need to file down. The chalk pen writes on them ok and can be easily rubbed off so they will do the job I wanted from them but they just feel cheap. For a mere £6 this isn’t really surprising but given the quality of similar products (notably Rory’s Story Cubes which are ~£10 for 9 dice with a range of themed sets) I was disappointed.

d20-03Would I recommend Story Dice, The Game? No, not unless I knew somebody that was wanting to prototype a game and needed the blank dice. Even then I’d be hesitant.

All reviews are rated out of 10, with Natural 20s reserved for products that go above and beyond. Unless otherwise stated review products have been purchased through normal retail channels.

Advertisements

2018 – Reflecting on the Year

2018 has come and gone. It was quite a year for me, both away from the hobby and at the gaming table. Coming out of 2017 my engagement with the hobby was nearing an all-time low. My actual gaming was limited to a game of Deadlands Noir that was cancelled more often than it was actually run and I was largely limited to keeping my interest alive through online interactions with the community.

After moving to Liverpool in April I decided to make an active effort to re-engage with gaming. This started with a decision to not rant about D&D and how it was the only system being advertised across the multiple gaming cafes in the city. It’s a decision that has served me well, to the point that this year I’ll be running my first campaign of 5th Edition for colleagues at work. I haven’t been this excited about D&D since 4th Edition launched, which I enjoyed from the tactical side but couldn’t really get into on the RP side.

Related to this I made the decision that if the games I wanted to see weren’t being offered then I would run them myself in my ongoing series of Monthly OneShots. They’ve been a moderate success but have suffered from the curse of last-minute player drop out. My aim for these going forward is to widen the breadth of games on offer and to burn through my stack of unplayed games. Ideally, I would like to take one and turn it into a campaign but that’ll have to wait for now as I’m not sure I have the time for two active campaigns.

On a publishing front, 2018 was a mixed year. I made close to zero progress on Project Cassandra and it has now been over a year since my last State of the Conspiracy update. The game isn’t dead, I just need to find the motivation to pull it off of the back burner and get it finished.

I was slightly more successful with releasing material for the Demon Hunters: A Comedy of Terrors RPG. I debuted a Victorian-inspired team, The Undesirables, the first step towards an epic adventure that I have been thinking about for a few years. 2018 also saw the release of Lockdown, the second of my Slice of Life adventure starters. I had hoped to release the remainder of the adventures last year, which clearly didn’t happen but I remain committed to doing so within the first few months of 2019. The release of Lockdown also saw my first few paid sales over on drivethruRPG. My total sales may only amount to < £10 but it was a big step forward as an indie publisher putting together material in my spare time.

Finally, here on my blog, I had what I’m going to class as a successful year. Thirty-eight blog posts pushed the blog to the most views and visitors I’ve ever had in a year. My review of the Savage Worlds GM Screen remains my most popular post. Going into 2019 my aim is to publish more reviews, with a mix of in-depth and quick, single paragraph posts to ensure I get them out promptly. If I can carry the momentum that I built in the latter half of 2018 then 2019 should be a great year in gaming.

Christmas Loot

Thanks to generous family who know me all too well I received a nice collection of loot for Christmas.

The pride and joy is the D&D arcana book, which I’ll be reviewing properly once I’ve read it (spoiler alert: it’s gorgeous), while the special edition of Frankenstein may serve as the start of a new collection of classic fantasy and sci-fi.

That’s a standard d20 next to the d6, which is stone and has a lovely weight to it. Doubt I’ll ever roll it but I am looking forward to using it as a clock / tracker in future games.

Gaming Plans for 2019

With another year almost at an end it seems appropriate to do both a reflection on my year in gaming and a look forward to my aims for next year. I’m going to look forward first, for a couple of reasons. Primarily I want to actually sit and actually reflect on the year, but also because I want to save that post for the first of 2019.

So, what are my aims for 2019?

Must do

  • Complete the Demon Hunters: Slice of Life adventure starters.
  • Run the Immortals D&D campaign and keep it going.
  • Finally finish Project Cassandra, though given how long it has been on the backburner I suspect this will require a complete rewrite.
  • Write Ghosts of Iron, my Crystal Heart adventure that was part of the recent Kickstarter.

Would be nice

  • Attend a number of conventions, ideally this would include Expo in the Summer and Dragonmeet next December but I’m going to be realistic and look for some local events first.
  • Finish and publish the The Kingsport Tribune, a one page Cthulhu game.
  • Write and publish a mission for The Sprawl, in collaboration with HyveMynd.
  • Design some business cards to publicise my material if it looks like I’m going to be at conventions.

Pipe dreams

  • Write, playtest and publish Rocket Demons of Antiquity. Given my notes and plans for this have gone from a basic adventure to a mini-campaign spanning two distinct eras and a whole host of characters this isn’t something I expect to be an easy task.

All in all that’s quite a lot but I think breaking it down into the above priorities list will help.

Monthly OneShots: The D&D Christmas Special

With the festive season in full swing, it made perfect sense to run a Christmas themed game as my monthly one-shot adventure. Many years ago I ran one such adventure for my group in Glasgow, using the lightweight, and now largely forgotten Big Eyes Small Mouth system. It was chaotic and immense fun so I decided to revive it like the ghost of Christmas past for this year’s game. Only rather than BESM, I’d run it in D&D 5th Edition. This was partially because I knew I would get more players but also because I feel like I need more experience with the system. Between Pale Reach and the upcoming Immortals campaign, 2019 is likely to be D&D heavy, with a one-shot I could experiment and play with encounter expectations.

The setup was simple, a caravan had gone missing during the depths of winter and a small group of adventurers had set out into the wilderness to find it. Becoming disorientated in the snow they stumbled upon a modern Santa’s lair, which had been taken over by a young dragon and her minions. Inside a clan of elves worked away as slaves, constructing toys and trinkets for the dragon’s horde.

Overall the adventure ran well, with the chaos that I had expected as the adventurers delved deeper into the workshop. Due to last minute cancellations, I was once again short of two players, which threw the balance out completely. The easy initial encounter became rather challenging (especially as it was the more martial characters that were missing) while the final boss fight would have been a TPK if two of the players hadn’t taken an unexpected approach, which resulted in offering to serve the dragon by taking on the role of Santa!

It was the middle encounter that I was happiest with as realising that they were outmatched in a fair fight the players tried cunning which we played out as an impromptu skill challenge. For something put together on the fly it worked really well and ended with the PCs freeing the elves and inciting a mini-rebellion to take out the ogres overseeing the production line.

All in all, I feel like the game was fun but also highlighted that I need to re-read the rules, especially for the rarer situations that can come up surprisingly often in D&D. Given I’ll be running a regular campaign full of new people I think this is a must, when it comes to running such an iconic game I want to ensure that they get an authentic experience and come out of it wanting more.

Diving into… my first D&D campaign

I’ve been slowly re-engaging with the hobby since moving to Liverpool earlier this year and one of the things I have really had to get over is my apprehension at playing D&D. I’ve blogged about this already but in short – the game is everywhere and if I want to play regularly then it is likely that it will have to be D&D.

So when the opportunity to run a game for a group of almost entirely new players at work came up? I grabbed it. No hesitation, no grumbling about better games. We had our first session at the start of the week, which covered character gen, a little bit of world building and a single introductory scene. While we’re going to stick to a fairly traditional game I’m making use of the fact that they are new to gaming to just slide some indie approaches into it. The main one – shared world building. I presented them with the following outline

The known world is comprised of six great Empires, encircling a vast wasteland that legend tells was once itself a powerful domain. The Empires are ruled by individuals that, collectively, are known as the Immortals. It is a time of relative peace but not prosperity. The Empires are locked in a permanent cold war, to attack one neighbour would leave them open to assault by another. In response the Immortals have turned inwards, isolating themselves in an attempt to maintain absolute control over their citizens. The old ways and religions are regulated, persecuted or driven underground. Only in the wastes can one truly be free. Bands of adventurers and rebels seek out lost riches and safe havens while merchants risk their wares for the chance of greater profit. Legends and prophecy, spoken only in whispers, speak of the Immortals and their origins.

but beyond that I want them to fill in the details. Who are the Immortals, what are the Empires like, what do the rebels seek? I have a couple of ideas for world-changing events, including a few set pieces. I’m also thinking of introducing something akin to the Last Breath move from Dungeon World. That way I can dial up the lethality while expanding on elements of the setting (fictionally the move will be associated with a possible backstory for the Immortals).

I have no idea if the game will take off, or whether it will fall foul of scheduling problems and player drop out, but for now, I am looking forward to it. I’m excited about D&D, I’m excited about building a campaign and getting to introduce some new players to this weird and wonderful hobby.

Crystal Heart Kickstarter: Final 24 Hours

24 hours! That’s all that is left for you to back the amazing Crystal Heart Kickstarter from Up to Four Comics. If you’re still on the fence then let’s summarise what you’ll be getting at this point:

  1. A full-colour setting book with 200+ pages of details and amazing artwork.
  2. Six, yes count them SIX short adventures, two of which are available now as free downloads and one of which will be written by yours truly.
  3. Ten bonus crystals for use in your games, with suggested adventure seeds for each.
  4. Themed bennies, available as both PDF or a  physical add-on.

You can get all this in digital format for a mere £15, back it while you still can.