Savage Problems

Savage Worlds is currently one of the most popular systems available, having seen a rapid rise in popularity since its release. Partially that’s down to the cost (the explorer’s edition of the core rulebook comes in at under £10), the wide range of available settings (central to which is the rebooted Deadlands setting) and the ease with which the system can be picked up.

All in all it’s a good system but having now had a chance to play it I’m slowly coming to the conclusion that it’s not a system for me.

Before I continue I will point out that I’ve played the game extensively, to date I’ve run it once,  played in a couple of one shots and most recently just finished playing in the first part of a Deadlands Noir campaign (which will be shifting to Cortex Classic when we resume it). It took all of that for me to get a proper feel for the system, and then work out what bugged me about it and in the end it came down to two interconnected issues.

Target number of four

One of the central tenets of Savage Worlds is that the basic target number for any action is 4. Apart, that is, from when it isn’t. Rather than having suggested difficulties Savage Worlds relies heavily on situational modifiers that can greatly raise or reduce the difficulty. On it’s own this isn’t a massive issue, the problem is that the numbers seem to vary so significantly that I just can’t get a handle on working out what I need to roll. Now part of this could be alleviated by the GM stating in advance what the difficulty is but even having that knowledge would only partially help. The reason it would only partially help is that once target numbers get above 8 (which seems to happen fairly regularly) most characters can only succeed with the aid of an exploding die.

And once explosions become a requirement rather than a bonus I (personally) just can’t keep track of my chances.

Combat

My issues with combat in Savage Worlds are mostly a continuation of of the target number four problem, complicated by the Shaken mechanic. The target number issue is as before, however, in combat target numbers seem to soar even higher. Parry, the “to hit” target number typically ranges from 4-8 (the highest in the Deluxe rulebook bestiary is 9) before inclusion of any modifiers but it’s toughness where the numbers get silly, with values often into double figures. That this can then be boosted by armour and that initially you need to get 4 higher again in order to cause a wound rather than a shaken result just takes the piss.

As a gamer with an interest in game design I suspect that this was a deliberate choice, meant to emulate pulp action scenes. For example take Indiana Jones, when he gets into a brawl with a tough opponent he lands plenty of blows that do nothing (hitting but failing to beat the toughness) before landing a few spectacular punches that floor the opponent. In a movie this works, in a game it’s just frustrating to land the attack then be told you’ve not done any damage.

I mentioned shaken being another bugbear of combat in Savage Worlds. This is a much simpler issue, being shaken takes reduces player involvement by preventing them from taking actions and players who can’t do anything get bored. Once again I understand the desire to emulate the genre but it just doesn’t translate into a workable mechanic. I suspect next time I run Savage Worlds I’ll house rule Shaken, turning it instead into a -1 or -2 penalty, that way players still have a chance to do something useful on their turn.

So there it is, my issues with Savage Worlds. They’re not big issues and certainly not ones that would prevent me from ever playing the system again but for the moment I’ll be heading back to Cortex, simply because it’s a system I grok.

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Review: Remember Me

This review was originally published over at Nearly Enough Dice

Remember Me is the first release from French studio DONTNOD and is available now for PS3, Xbox 360 and PC.

rememberme1aSetting

The game focuses on Nilin, a memory hunter fighting against Memorize, a corporation whose digital memory implants have transformed the lives of everybody in Neo-Paris. As you might expect from such a setup the game exists within a cyberpunk (technically neo-cyberpunk given the wireless nature of the technology employed) setting and opens with Nilin having her memory forcibly extracted. From there you take on the role of Nilin as she struggles against Memorize to recover her identity and understand why she was fighting them to begin with.

From the start it is clear that DONTNOD get cyberpunk and its aesthetics. Neo-Paris is a beautifully designed dystopian city of high tech, high living built upon a dirty, cobbled together underworld that still maintains a colourful (and often neon) way of life. Visually the world is not only stunning but thought out, stylistic choices are both consistent and logical, building together to make for an extremely believable city. Similarly Nilin is presented in a fairly realistic style, her main outfit isn’t some futuristic one piece, its jeans, a plain top and a jacket. Yeah they add some future tech such as her boots (which have some sort of exoskeleton extending from them) and Sensen memory tech (which visualise as holograms around one arm and on the back of her neck) but the core of her outfit is, like the rest of the world, built on a believable and, for want of a better description, normal look. It is this grounded yet developed sense of normality that makes the game world feel alive, something which is often overlooked in other similar settings.

rememberme2As the game progresses it explores, in true cyberpunk fashion, the relationship between the two co-dependent halves of Neo-Paris while also exploring a number of other themes central to the genre (though to avoid spoilers I’ll avoid even mentioning which themes). It does this extremely well and as with the visual identity the story is tight, well written and develops at a sensible pace. Before moving on to the gameplay I just want to quickly highlight one other aspect, the soundtrack. It is, quite simply, brilliant and adds that final piece of atmosphere to the game. In particular its implied use of digital artifacts, moments where the music jerks or stutters, are truly inspired and really help in projecting an immersive digital world.
Gameplay

Remember Me is a third person action game with a mixed focus of unarmed melee combat and traditional climbing adventuring. Unfortunately, and in contrast to the setting development, the gameplay fails to come together into a cohesive whole with, severely detracting from the final experience. The first issue is the linearity of the game. After designing such an amazing world DONTNOD fail to utilise it, instead choosing to constantly direct Nilin into corridors or high walled streets that only go in one direction. Adding in larger areas, with more opportunity to explore would have greatly improved the experience of playing. You could have still had linear goals (ie get from A to B) but with multiple routes available climbing could have become more freeform while also introducing Deus Ex like moments of ‘do I sneak past these guards or take them on and risk reinforcements arriving.’

The second, bigger issue, is the combat. On the outset the approach is reminiscent of the combat in the Batman Arkham games but with a bigger focus on combo’s, which are managed through the Presens system. The concept of the system is simple, given a set combo (ie Square-Triangle-Triangle) you can customise the effect of the combo at each stage by assigning certain presens to it. The presens themselves are assigned to 1 of 4 types: damage boost, health regen, cooldown boost and chain multiplier. So for example you could combine 3 damage boosts together to generate a hard hitting combo or combine health regeneration with cooldown (which increases the frequency with which your special moves can be employed).

On the surface this is a great idea but like other aspects of the gameplay fails to come together as effectively as it needs to. The biggest problem is that the combat just doesn’t flow as well as it should. This makes the bigger combos unnecessarily difficult to pull off when fighting larger groups of enemies, either due to being hit or because you’re constantly dodging attacks. In theory it’s possible to continue a combo after dodging but I found this to be particularly difficult to do and therefore avoided using the longer combos during most encounters. Again a comparison with the Batman games is apt, where larger groups of opponents make it all the easier to flow combos together and where it is possible to dodge and simply continue the combo against a different opponent. Without that flow the encounters of Remember Me often become frustratingly difficult, which severely detracts from the game as a whole.rememberme3

Perhaps the most unusual gameplay element is that of the memory remixes, where Nilin alters somebodies memories in order to change their personality or outlook on life. It would have been easy for DONTNOD to have merely employed a cutscene for these sections but instead provide a mechanism to alter the scene by identifying memory glitches, which when changed impact on how the scene develops. While these sections typically boil down to trial and error (change a glitch, see what happens, rewind and try again with a different combination of glitches) the remix scenes are used sparingly enough that they don’t become boring and each instance provides a rather unique insight into the motivations of both the character being remixed and Nilin herself.

Wrapup

All in all Remember Me is an extremely difficult game to review, which explains how polarizing other scores have been (I’ve seen as low as 1/5 and as high as 4/5). It is, in the truest sense, a diamond in the rough, a game that has everything it needs yet one that also fails to pull it together into a cohesive whole. For me the setting and world DONTNOD has developed is enough to counter the deficiencies in gameplay but I can also appreciate how that won’t be the case for many others.

Final score: 3/5

Quicfic: Atmosphere

T-minus 30 seconds

She hated grav drops, hated them with a passion. It wasn’t the drop itself, 120km up from a suborbital spaceplane is one hell of a distance but after the first dozen everything had fallen into a simple routine. No what Jana couldn’t stand was the view. From this high up the world appeared as it truly was, dirty, polluted and spoilt. The ‘shopped landscapes, Corporate sponsored jungles and managed nature reserves were impossible to spot; sprawling city complexes, barren open cast mines and lifeless wastelands constituted the modern, industrial environment.

The plane itself was little more than a cigar tube strapped to a SCRAMjet, its stubby wings retracted almost completely into the body, minimising both drag and cross sectional size. Despite this Jana and her partner Ajax faced an unpowered grav-glide into the enemy territory, one of the few remaining options for a rapid yet covert tactical insertion. ‘Systems are go, life support is in the green,’ Ajax’s voice chimed in her head, her sub dermal comn unit cutting through the background whine of the engines. ‘and the pup is dreaming of steak. See you on the downslide.’ There was the slightest of vibrations as his pod detached, though it too would break apart once it had protected Ajax from the punishing ordeal of re-entry. Ten seconds and an unknown distance later it was Jana’s turn. As the pod began its descent she thought about the dozen or so decoy pods which were also being let loose, a further attempt to conceal the location of their mission. It was comforting to know that a heartless mega-corporation valued her skills enough to spend that sort of money on her, it ensured a sense of loyalty most employees would never understand.

Within the hour she’d be on the ground of another Corporate city, lining up her scope over the face of some nameless executive while Ajax secured their exit strategy. If everything went to plan they’d be back on home turf within 6 hours.

It sure as hell beat a desk job.

June RPG Blog Carnival: Favourite NPCs

Arcane Game Lore hosts this months RPG blog carnival and asks “Who’s your favourite NPC?”, a question which can be applied to both GMs and players. This isn’t a particularly easy question for me to answer, not because I have too many to chose from but because the majority of my games tend to focus heavily on intra-party issues, with few NPCs that get enough scene time to make a significant impact. Truth be told my NPCs are one of the biggest areas of my GM style I’d like to improve upon, but that’s a post for another time. So after some thinking I’ve come up with two favourites, who made the cut for very different reasons.

The first comes from my first Serenity campaign, which was the first campaign where I’d applied a very freeform (but not quite sandbox) approach focused purely on the goals of the PC characters as opposed to a save the world big issue type of campaign with clear aims and objectives. While the scheduling of the game was cursed (and we never did get as far into it as I’d have liked) it stands as one of my favourite campaigns as when it did run everything just slotted into place, including Alex C, a record producer at Blue Nova Records. For the most part Alex was an over the top, flamboyant character who used buzz words and three letter acronyms like they were going out of fashion. The thing is, it was all an act, something which only showed during a few occasional moments with Xoxi, one of the PCs and Alliance intelligence officer who was working at Blue Nova undercover while she dealt with some particularly nasty psychological trauma.

We never got far enough into the game for much to be made of Alex and his background but he did manage enough screen time for the hidden side of him to show and demonstrate he was more than first appearances would suggest. One of the plot threads I had started hinting at was some internal turmoil occurring within Alliance intelligence, triggered as a response to the events of Serenity (the movie). If we’d have continued then Alex would have been central to that, either by turning up dead somehow or by seeking the assistance of the PCs in evading / foiling particular events. Maybe, if I ever run another Serenity game, he’ll show up again though I suspect that may be a while away.

My second favourite NPC is a character I’ve mentioned repeatedly in previous posts, as he went on to become a PC and one of the pregen characters for my Nationals Demon Hunters game. Doyl LevettYup, Doyl Levett, caffeinomancer extraordinaire. Doyl started off life as an NPC in my very first Demon Hunters game, with the chapter not only finding him lost in the middle of the Warehouse but with a group of ROUS close behind him. While not a member of the Brotherhood at that time his basic character was already there, a coffee mage (though he didn’t know it) who had stumbled into the Warehouse by accident. From there it was simple to convert him into a full PC when I finally managed to play in a game of Demon Hunters and he quickly turned into one of my all time favourite PCs to play, with the added bonus that it lets me drink copious amounts of coffee and claim that I’m just acting in character.

May’s RPG Blog Carnival: Campaign’s I’d like to run

  For May’s RPG blog carnival Age of Ravens asks: What campaign would you like to run? Like anybody who has spent more time behind the GM screen than in front of it I could point to a wide range of systems and settings that I’d like to run but campaigns, they’re a little trickier. To me asking what campaign I’d like to run goes beyond a simple multiple session adventure (or series of adventures), a campaign to me is something that envisages a long term game with an over arching theme from the start, antagonists with long term goals and NPCs / factions that have time to develop in response to the actions of the PCs.

So what campaigns would I like to run then? Well I’ve got 3 that immediately come to mind.

  1. Torggame-logo
    Torg by West End Games
    Torg served as my introduction to tabletop RPGs when I first moved to Glasgow in 2006 and after a year of playing in a great campaign I transferred from player to GM and it became the first campaign I ever ran. This one is therefore, a bit of a cheat, as I’ve already run the campaign once before. The thing is at the time I was a rookie, both to RPGs and even more so to GMing and as such I made mistakes. Truth be told I made a lot of mistakes. So that’s why I’d like to run the campaign again, to truly do justice to the epic campaign that was published for the game and that spans from the invasion of earth by multiple alternative dimensions all the way through to a world shattering conclusion.
  2. talesomega3
    Demon Hunters by Margaret Weiss Productions and Dead Gentlemen Productions
    This is another cheat answer in some respects as I regularly run games of Demon Hunters that, along with the games run by a couple of friends, comprise what we’ve termed a meta campaign, loosely collected together over on Obsidian Portal as Tales of the Omega. However what we’ve never done is draw it all together with a larger overarching plot or central villains, all the existing games are essentially independent of one another at present. This is in part because of the ad-hoc nature of the games at this point, having moved away from Glasgow I now only play Demon Hunters on the rare occasions when I’m both visiting and can get the right people together.
  3. corporation
    Corporation by Brutal Games
    To wrap up this post is the final campaign that I’d like to run, one that is completely free from any of my existing or previous games. Corporation is a cyberpunk / sci-fi game with a well established world setting. Much of which I’d like to ignore. Instead I’d like to focus more on a traditional cyberpunk angle, the emergence of AIs and the effect that increasing cyberisation has on the population as a whole. Now I’ll be the first to admit that this isn’t a new angle, truth be told such campaign themes are really what the original cyberpunk stories of Gibson et al were all about. But it’s not a campaign that I’ve run in the past and it is a genre that I wish I’d played more of. When, or even if, I’ll get to run it is something I don’t know but until then I can keep on dreaming of my electric sheep.

On Star Trek: Into Darkness

**** SPOILERS AHEAD! ****

I went to see Star Trek: Into Darkness this afternoon and to say I was disappointed is an understatment. Insulted would be more accurate or to quote what I posted on Facebook:

So Star Trek: Into Darkness. An idiotic over the top summer blockbuster which lacks any intelligent consistency as it rushes from one ludicrous action scene to the next. Not worthy of bearing the name Star Trek.

What follows below the cut is going to contain SPOILERS, so don’t say I didn’t warn you.

Continue reading “On Star Trek: Into Darkness”

Engrenages: First Impressions

novo-ENGRENAGES-logo-300x82This post originally appeared over on Nearly Enough Dice

Engrenages: First Impressions

Sunday afternoon of Conpulsion I got a chance to play in a demo of Engrenages, a game in development by a group of students from Kedge Business School in France. While the game is still in development I wanted to provide my first impressions of the game. Before I do though I’ll first point you to the interview Nearly Enough Dice conducted with two of the developers, which you can find here.

Setting

The setting for Engrenages is an alternative history steampunk world, sometime in the late 19th century. The setting differs from the typical steampunk, however, due to the presence of the Secade, a reptilian race whose civilization controls the majority of the North American continent (and possibly South America as well). The European expansion into the continent has, therefore, been limited to a scattering of settlements along the Eastern seaboard. Chief amongst these is the city of Havengrinn, where the expatiates of the Old World seek political power by day and occult knowledge by night. Combined together the world provides an interesting and different take on the steampunk genre while the inclusion of the Secade encourages a strong pulp feel and suggests adventure and exploration are going to be important components of the final game. The demo scenario was focused around the exploration of a ruined city, located within the no-mans land between Secade and human territory and the discovery of an ancient temple that may help humanity develop their understanding of the Secade culture and civilization. The adventure was fairly interesting, although a few of the scenes felt forced or out of place, in part because they added little to the flow of the story.

System

The central mechanic of Engrenages is a basic die roll + fixed attribute / skill bonus, however, on making a skill roll players must choose whether their action draws upon chaos or order (represented by different coloured dice) and roll accordingly. This choice is designed to impact directly on the narrative, both in terms of the way skills are being performed and the way the result pans out. Depending on the situation the GM may force use of a particular die or alter what is achievable depending on whether an ordered or chaotic approach is utilised. Take, as an example Indiana Jones, a classic pulp hero archetype. During his many adventures he’s likely to use his archaeology skill to decode ancient riddles, saving him from an untimely death from the traps concealed in the temples he is investigating. Such an action would force use of the chaos die, as he’s likely charged in, set the trap off and is trying to stop it before he goes squish. If however he had gone in with a more cautious approach then he could have used his order die, decoding the riddle in advance and avoiding setting the trap off at all.

While it wasn’t included as part of the demo the chaos / order mechanic would also be well suited to incorporate an advantage / complications system similar to that of Fate’s aspects, where the aspect can be utilised to provide both a bonus and a penalty. For Engrenages this would work well where the aspect provides a bonus to a skill when used with one die type and a penalty when using it with the other. Going back to the Indiana Jones example he could easily have an aspect along the lines of “Brilliant explorer” which would provide a bonus when using the chaos die in combination with his archaeology skill. However a more ordered approach, such as combing through library texts, bore our hero to the point that he often misses important details, represented by a penalty when using an order die to make archaeology checks.

Wrap-up

Based on the demo and from talking to the creators of the game Engrenages has done pipped my interest enough to keep an eye out on it. At present it appears to very much be a game that is a work in progress so it will be interesting to see what directions it takes in the long run so expect to hear more about the game as and when information becomes available. In the meantime you can find out more about Engrenages on their blog.