Review: D&D Monster Cards 6-16 by Gale Force Nine

As my D&D campaign has progressed my players have slowly murdered encountered tougher and tougher opponents. It’s the way that D&D works, which meant that sooner or later I was going to want to field creatures with challenge ratings above 5. We’ve now reached that point, so it seems appropriate to review the second of Gale Force Nine’s Monster Card packs, which covers CR 6-16.

This slighly smaller pack provides 74 creatures, once again using a mix of regular and double width cards with images on the front and stats on the back. The majority are double width, which isn’t really surprising given the more complex rules associated with many of these creatures. As with the CR 0-5 pack the cards are of good quality and presented in a consistent, clear format that includes their special abilities. As a reference resource they work, though you’ll need to look up the details of any spells that are listed (which is understandable)

Unfortunately, as with the CR 0-5 pack Gale Force Nine have chosen to omit a number of monsters, including some of the more iconic entries. You get, for example, all of the Young Dragons but not a single Adult Dragon. There’s also no Beholder but for some reason the CR 17 Dragon Turtle and Goristro are present (I don’t know if this is a mistake in my pack or not because GF9 don’t list the contents anywhere I could find). Apparently some of the omissions are because they didn’t want to include anything with a lair action, which I think is a rather ludicrous choice given the stated CR range.

All in all the pack is rather disappointing, while I will make use of the cards for quick reference the omissions compromise it too much for me to recommend it at the RRP of $16/£13. That goes double if you already have easy access to the Monster Manual.

All reviews are rated out of 10, with Natural 20s reserved for products that go above and beyond my expectations. Unless otherwise stated all review products have been purchased through normal retail channels.

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New Release: Trick of the Light Adventure Starter

Recruitment drives. When you go through Agents at the rate the Brotherhood does they’re a necessary evil. Normally we’d send somebody from personnel but they’re on an away day. Again. So pack your bags, you’re off to Vegas and the Convention of Magical Americans. We need you to scout the show for any potential recruits, every year there’s at least one true student of the arcane arts mixed in amongst the stage magicians. Not that you should discount the illusionists, misdirection and sleight of hand are just as valuable in our line of work.

We’ve nabbed some press passes for you. Well, we told them you were influencers… whatever that means. So look the part and try not to go too viral, your health insurance doesn’t cover that.

Trick of the Light is an adventure starter for the Demon Hunters: A Comedy of Terrors RPG by Dead Gentlemen Productions. Inspired by the Demon Hunters: Slice of Life episode The Amazing Velma this adventure starter provides an open framework for GMs to adapt and run the adventure for their own groups. Can the Chapter find and recruit mystical talents without blowing their cover? Was the death of famous magician Griff McCarn really an accident and how on earth do we get Nicky to leave us alone?

Trick of the Light is available at drivethruRPG & Itchio as a Pay What You Want PDF download. Paid purchases, feedback or reviews are greatly appreciated and keep me motivated to produce more material.

Download it now from drivethruRPG or Itchio

Review: Legend of the Five Rings 5th Edition Beginner Game

Legend of the Five Rings is one of those games that holds special significance for many players. Since its inception the world of Rokugan has presented players with an approach to adventuring in sharp contrast to the traditions of D&D. To paraphrase a statement I’ve heard from multiple people

“Everybody is trying to play a paladin, except your moral code is in constant conflict with itself to the point that any solution to a challenge is simultaneously both the right and wrong thing to do.”

It’s a complicated (and often intimidating) world, built up over decades by AEG through both its RPG and CCG. So when Fantasy Flight Games acquired the licence, reset the lore and redesigned the system to use their custom dice it left many fans hesitant. After a turbulent open beta the first product in the new 5th edition line was the Beginners Game box set, released in 2018. I picked it up at the 2019 UK Games Expo and wanted to share my thoughts.

The Contents

The beginner game comes with everything needed to introduce the world of Rokugan to a new group.

5d6 (ring) and 5d12 (skill) dice with custom symbols.
1 introduction to Rokugan pamphlet.
1 introductory adventure – The Topaz Championship
1 rulebook
4 character folios
1 double-sided map sheet (1 large map, 2 smaller ones)
1 sheet of cardboard tokens

All of the above is provided in full colour, with extensive artwork that lives up to the expectations set by previous editions of the game and professional layout. There’s no other way to say this – this game looks great. Everything is also clearly labelled in terms of read order – with clear “Read this first/second/last” and “Only turn this page when told to” text blocks that help delineate sections.

The character folios are well designed, with clear background information and two double page character sheets. The first presents the character as they are at the start of the adventure, the second is blank and allows for players to spend XP following the adventures interlude. A particularly nice touch is the legend that explains the various sections of the character sheet, which will help avoid the all too common “where is X” or “how do I do Y” questions.

The Adventure and Rules

At the core of the box set is the introductory adventure – The Topaz Championship. This has been a staple since the early days of Rokugan and follows a group of young samurai as they seek to complete their gempukku, the coming of age ceremony that will mark them as adults. The 5th Edition write-up presented here has been cleanly repurposed not just as an introduction to the setting but to the mechanics. Rather than introduce everything all at once each scene layers on a new component, from basic dice rolls all the way up full combat. While the structure of the adventure is relatively straightforward it is generally well designed, extremely well presented and ideal for beginner groups. There is, unfortunately, a potential for the contests to devolve into a simple series of rolls with little roleplaying and new GMs could easily find themselves overwhelmed.

For more advanced groups there are a number of suggestions on how to expand the scope of the scenario, through extra encounters and intrigue. By the end of the Championship players and GM should have a good grasp of the base mechanics… to a point. A number of rules have been simplified requiring players and GM to relearn some mechanics if they continue beyond the initial adventure.

The rulebook included alongside the adventure is there for groups that want to go a little bit further and includes rules that are closer to those found in the full Core Rulebook. I say closer because a number of areas are omitted. There is no character creation or further options for spending XP. Disadvantages are absent, as are any rules for magic while only a partial and quick system is included for duelling. Without owning the Core Rulebook it is difficult to say what else has been omitted and how many systems have been simplified (I get the impression that the answer is quite a lot).

An extremely notable absence is the matter of death. With the exception of to the death duels there are no rules for when a character dies (and even then it is left to GM fiat). They can be incapacitated or rendered unconscious but that’s as far the text goes. For a system that has historically been associated with sudden character death this is a major omission and just doesn’t make any sense.

But what of the new system? Overall I have to say that I really like it. The new take on role and keep retains the flavour of exploding rolls without being as needlessly complicated as FFGs earlier take on Star Wars. Similarly the use of approaches and skill groups is a great way to limit a single attribute from dominating play.

Two of the skill groups and the associated approaches, taken from the core rules character sheet

The approach of encouraging players to use of all the rings even carries over into combat as each of the stances is tied to a specific ring. This forces players to consider whether they want to use their best ring or the bonus effect associated with a particular stance. I haven’t had a chance to stress test combat and assess how lethal it is but the mixture of fatigue and critical injuries makes a lot of sense and I could easily see characters being quickly incapacitated thanks to the multiple ways in which fatigue can accumulate. It is worth noting that I have seen posts online suggesting that the core rules may take a different approach to damage (though it is possible these were referring to the beta rules) and until I buy that book it will be difficult to really appreciate how combat plays out.

Perhaps the biggest point of contention during the beta was the strife mechanic but I think it may be one of the best additions to the game. Representing inner turmoil with mechanically helps to not only make the characters more human but to normalise the idea that they will slip up on occasion and drop the emotional mask that society expects them to wear. There were complaints that it took away player agency but to me that’s missing the point. Emotional outbursts are all about losing agency, whether they are screams of pure anguish or raucous laughter from a joke that shouldn’t be funny. You’re not in control and the mechanics highlight that. What’s especially nice is that they provide you an option to grit your teeth and pretend everything is ok but doing so prevents you from keeping dice that roll the strife symbol.

All in all the system does well to incorporate more modern, narrative based approaches to roleplaying while retaining a traditional core and so long as you are happy with the limited character progression (and lack of magic) you could easily use this introductory rulebook to run your own adventures.

The Issues

There is a lot to like about the Beginner Game and I really want to say that I love it. Unfortunately there are just too many issues that detract from the set as a whole. First up are the mistakes. The booklets are littered with typos and sentences that don’t quite make sense. Most prominent is in the character folios, where the description of how to spend XP includes this glaring error:

The most prominent typo in the included character folios

That’s right, it says that to increase the ring costs 2x the new value and then uses maths that implies it is 3x. As an experienced gamer I can use my judgment and be fairly confident they meant 3x but this is a set aimed at new players, who might not be so sure. Given the retail price of ~£30 (making it more expensive than many starter sets) I would have expected proper proofreading from FFG. This appears to have been amended on the bonus online character folios so is hopefully something that will also be fixed in any subsequent printings.

Then there’s the choice of contents. Of the three maps (Tsuma village, the Emerald Champion’s castle and Rokugan itself) only one is actually used by the included adventure. The castle map requires that you download the free followup adventure, while the map of Rokugan would be better included with the core rulebook or GM kit. Next are the tokens, which are pretty much useless in my opinion. The game doesn’t use a combat map and while it does suggest you could use them to indicate where in Tsuma village characters are that just feels like an excuse to include them. How often will the party be separated to such a degree that you have trouble remembering where they all are? How often will you need 10 goblin tokens?

I just don’t see the point and would have preferred it if FFG had included the additional character folios from their website (you get only 4 while 3 more are available online). It’s also worth noting that if you wanted to print out additional copies of the included character folios you’ll need to purchase a digital copy of the beginner game. There is a standard, art free character sheet available online but it omits the useful explanations and background information that is present on the introductory folios.

Speaking of the characters – who on earth thought it would be a good idea to include a shugenja with no spells? Yes, you heard me correctly, one of the characters is a magic user but lacks any actual magical abilities! They can purchase a relatively limited spiritual technique during the interlude but that’s it, for most the adventure they are essentially just a scholar. I get that the characters are all young and in the process of completing the coming of age process but seriously? Magic is the whole point of being a shugenja and you couldn’t include even one basic spell? If the rules for magic are that complicated then just omit the class and include a note that it will be included in the core rules.

Wrap up

I have to admit that when I first opened the Beginner Game box set I was apprehensive. The open beta had left me with mixed feelings, the rules were too raw and felt like they had been rushed, as evidenced by how much even core mechanics changed during the course of playtesting. But I have to give FFG credit, they did change them and for the better. Legend of the Five Rings 5th Edition is shaping up to be a solid game, with all the style and character of the previous editions. Which is why I wish I could rate this product more highly but ultimately the rules and presentation are let down by one too many small issues. Typos and errors, a magic user that doesn’t cast magic, tokens and maps that aren’t actually needed by the included adventure.

So would I recommend purchasing this? I don’t think so. In many respects it is a great introduction to the setting and system and is an excellent way to ease an entirely new group into the world of Rokugan. But it’s an expensive introductory set (mostly due to the requirement of including FFGs custom dice) and I just don’t see many people new to the hobby picking it up. I think it would actually work better if it were slimmed down even further to a shrink-wrapped magazine like format including just the adventure, character folios and dice, sold for just a little bit more than the stand alone dice set. That would put it in the impulse buy territory for both new and old players.

For more experienced tables my advice is simple – buy the core rulebook and club together for a set of the dice.

All reviews are rated out of 10, with Natural 20s reserved for products that go above and beyond my expectations. Unless otherwise stated all review products have been purchased through normal retail channels.

State of the Conspiracy: Cheat-sheet, updated characters and going forward

While I may not have run it in the end the day before UK Games Expo I made a decision to bring along a set of character sheets for Project Cassandra in the off chance there was a chance of testing it out / showing it off / running it. Given the full text is still in pieces I knew I wouldn’t have that to fall back on so I also put together a one page cheat-sheet. Doing so really highlighted what I have known for a while – that while the current draft still needs further playtesting I have a game there. I could sit down and run it and it would be a fun game. The core mechanics are fun (but need stress testing) as is the setup (Cold War psychics saving the world). I’m even proud of the more novel elements such as Knowledges and the way the starting Vision allows for the players to both have an input in the entire adventure but in a way that means their characters are just as knowledgable about the challenges to come.

The new character sheets (albeit rather blurry)

So what’s holding me back? Me. Writing is not something that comes easy to me, editing even less so. The thought of picking up the manuscript again after so long away from it is daunting. Large chunks need rewritten, a numer of areas need significant expansion and then I need to go over it all again with a fine tooth comb. But I can do it, I wrote a 70,000 word doctoral thesis so I know I can handle a 20-30 page long game.

With that in mind what’s my next step? Ironically, not writing as I have a few other projects to finish first. Ghosts of Iron, Demon Hunters Slice of Life starter, The Sprawl Synth trilogy I’ve been working on.

What I can do now is run it and start some of that stress testing. Make notes and check that I’ve resolved the issues from that informative (yet so frustrating) Dragonmeet playtest. One of the big things I can do is to start sharing material again. After the Dragonmeet game I took my drafts down, partially because I expected to quickly replace them with updates but also becuase my excitement had turned to disappointment in seemingly jumping the gun.

So this time, material up piecemeal and as it develops, starting with the current character sheets and the system cheat sheet. All subject to change but also all out there for feedback and comments.

UK Games Expo 2019 – Links roundup

Having attended this years UK Games Expo for only a single day (see my report on it here) I ‘ve been reading over convention reports from other people to obtain a wider appreciation of the event. As I imagine others might be in the same position I wanted to share some links for everybody to enjoy.

The below selection focuses almost exclusively on blog posts and is neither an exhaustive roundup nor endorsement of the listed blogs in general. If you have a post that you would like included just leave a message in the comments, if I get enough I’ll put together an additional post to highlight them.

Attendees

Another Day in Paradise by the TableTop Games Blog
Expos and Pirates and Castles, Oh My! by First Take Some Dice
Hope’s Last Stand – UK Games Expo Preview of Alien: The Roleplaying Game by AvP Galaxy
UK Games Expo 2019: Games…  Lots of games by Geek Pride
1D6 UK Games Expo ’19 Exposed by The Grognard Files with a followup photo scrapbook
UKGE 2019 Roundup by Big Red Barrel
The Game Shelf @ The UK Games Expo 2019 Day 1 and Day 2
A full series of posts from The Giant Brain individually covering Day 0, Day 1, Day 2 and Day 3
UK Games Expo 2019 by The Crooked Staff
UK Games Expo 2019 by What Luke Did Next…and What Lottie Loves
UK Games Expo 2019 report by In 2 The Review
UK Games Expo in Pictures by The Real Jobby
Event Report: UKGE 2019 by Story Makers Games

Stall holders / publishers

Thoughts from UK Games Expo 2019 by Owen Duffy, publisher of The Board Game Book.
Fun and Book Signing on the Author Stand at the UK Games Expo 2019 by SC Skillman
UK Games Expo Report by Scott Gaeta of Renegade Game Studios
UKGE Recap! by Goodman Games (New! Added post-publication on the 7th June)

Some top games lists

Our Games of UK Games Expo 2019 by Coaching for Geeks
Top 10 Games UK Games Expo 2019 by Creaking Shelves
Top 5 Games of the UK Games Expo 2019 by Geek Pride

And last but not least, a seminar recording

How to GM – Live From UK Games Expo 2019 by What would the smart party do?

UK Games Expo 2019 – Thoughts from a one day visit

After many years of not quite making it 2019 was the year that I finally attended UK Games Expo, the largest gaming convention here in the UK. Having made the decision at the last minute I attended for only the Saturday, with a focus on surveying the trade halls and demoing games.

The scale of that task was quickly apparent, my casual stroll to get my bearings and see what was on offer took over an hour and a half! Rather than ramble on I thought I’d do a quick hots and nots but first my haul:

A rather modest one given everything that was on offer. A physical copy of The Cthulhu Hack is something that I have been wanting to pick up since acquiring the PDFs while the dry erase character sheets are a perfect idea for quick games or the innevitable character death. Villagers was a game I’d never heard of before but was able to demo and I knew pretty quickly I wanted to pick it up. We’ve played a few games since I got it home and while it is a little complicated to explain it plays quickly is a lot of fun once you know what you are doing. Finally the Legend of the Five Rings 5th Edition Starter Set. As a big fan of the 4th Edition this new, wildly different take on the samurai staple has been on my radar ever since the beta test. While I’ve not had a chance to fully read over it my intial impressions are decidedly mixed, expect a full post soon once I’ve had a chance to do a thorough read through.

Hots

So many games. To say the expo is big is an understatement, it’s massive and it was great to see the games hobby in such a vibrant state. There was a healthy mix of big and small publishers, independents and even component manufacturers present. While RPGs comprised only a small portion of this all of the stalls were doing a healthy trade and I heard a few publishers say that they’d quickly sold out of some lines.

Catching up with people. Like much of the community I find that most of my gaming interactions these days are online rather than in person so Expo offered a rare chance to catch up with people and put some faces to the various people that I have met through twitter, podcasts and other communities. There were some that I didn’t get a chance to see, hopefully next year I’ll be around for longer and able to arrange for a post game pint somewhere.

Games On Demand. Having only decided to attend at the last minute and wanting to focus on the trade hall I made the decision to pop down to Games on Demand for a quick two hour game. I should have spent more time there, as in retrospect, I enjoy the actual gaming experience far more than I do looking at games. The GMs were great, running a complete game in a 2 hour time slot is not easy and each of them appeared to have multiple systems on offer! The ultimate credit though must go to the organiser Lloyd for putting it together and running one of the most organised spaces I’ve seen at a convention.

Food options. Expecting limited options and long queues I’d brought food with me but realistically I needn’t have worried as the NEC had numerous vendors and there was even a collection of food trucks setup outside the Hilton.

Nots

Lack of water fountains. With thousands of people crammed into what is essentially a giant warehouse it was always going to be hot, compounded by the fact that outside it was a hot day building towards thunderstorm weather. That combination made the atmosphere inside rather oppressive, with little airflow and more than once I found myself having to step outside to get some fresh air. While those factors are out of the control of Expo something that they could have done with was more water fountains. As I was carrying a water bottle I was keeping an eye out for them but only found one during the course of the day (I suspect there were more, but if there were they weren’t obvious). Given the conditions and number of visitors I was both surprised and disappointed by that.

Me. If I’m honest I wasn’t 100% in the right headspace for the Expo. I was tired and found myself a little overwhelmed by the crowds. That led to me not engaging with stalls as much as I wanted to (something I find difficult at the best of times) and avoiding a few particularly busy demo areas because I couldn’t really face waiting around in a crowded area until a space became available.

#AprilTTRPGmaker Roundup

I’m quite fond of attempting the daily post challenges that pop up on Twitter, they provide a quick way to engage with the RPG industry outside of my own little corner of it and more often than not get me thinking about aspects of it that I may not have spent as long on as I should. The April TTRPG maker challenge has been no exception, particularly with its inclusion of questions that have asked me to think about the status quo and my place within it. Below, my daily answers, which turned out to be far longer than I had originally expected. Thanks go to @kiranansi for putting it together – check their profile for more of their work including More Seats at the Table, an email newsletter designed to highlight games by creators from marganalised communities.

aprilTTRPGmaker

1) I’m Craig – geek, gamer, geneticist based in Liverpool, UK and I publish under the umbrella of LunarShadow Designs

2) My published material so far has been adventure starters for @DG_DemonHunters Demon Hunters: A Comedy of Terrors RPG. Later in the year will also see releases of adventures for @Upto4Players Crystal Heart and @TheSprawl_RPG (in collaboration with @HyveMynd)

3) Commuting. Most of my time to and from work is spent thinking about RPGs or jotting down ideas (notebook/one note). My old London commute was even long enough to do bursts of writing or layout.

4) Not entirely sure, I like variety. I guess the closest answer I have is ones with clear conclusions. I much prefer a single clear and central arc for a campaign and would rather a fixed duration than open ended games. Is that a scenario though? I don’t know.

5) At the table – Characters. While I enjoy worldbuilding in my experience it rarely gets seen. It’s a valuable prep aid for GMs but ultimately the characters have greater impact based on their choices at the table.

6) While there are games where I’d happily spend the evening reading then just for the enjoyment I get out of their world building (L5R, Corporation, Demon Hunters) for actually running games I am slowly shifting towards shorter texts. It helps that these days my system preferences tend towards games that avoid pages of virtually identical weapons or hundreds of creatures each with a full page of stats etc

7) The first of probably many difficult questions. In terms of cost I can see the arguments for lower entry price points but many professionals seem to struggle to make a living and actually, I think RPGs are often incredible value for money per hour of play. Regards disabilities first and foremost speak to those who are affected. One relatively easy thing I think we can do is release plain text files alongside regular PDFs. Fancy layout and backgrounds look nice but aren’t accessible for a lot of people.

8) I’ve only had the pleasure of working with a small number of people, all of whom are amazing. @emzyesque on my @DG_DemonHunters material, @HyveMynd with our missions for @TheSprawl_RPG and @Upto4Players who offered me my first commissioned writing credit. There are plenty of others I would love to work with in the future but before I get to that point I need to clear the backlog of my own personal projects.

9) They largely follow a traditional asymmetric setup with a GM taking on a lot of the perceived ‘power’ of defining elements. Overall I don’t have any issues with that so long as everybody, GM included, understands and respects the different roles.

That said with Project Cassandra one of the things I have tried to do is shift some of the ‘power’ to the players (which I’m defining here as anybody who isn’t the GM) in a way that explicitly fits with the setup – individuals with psychic powers. The PCs all possess precognitive abilities so it makes thematic sense for them to occasionally control & define significant narrative details. The rest of the time it is out of their control, thematically in line with the emergence of the conspiracy.

This isn’t to say that every game should be that way. I want to experiment more with shared narrative control and mechanisms where the ‘power’ at the table shifts during play. But that’s in the future, once I’ve finished my existing projects.

10) This is one of the questions where I am going to hold my hand up and say I don’t know if they do and that I need to do more work to learn about the issues, especially the subtler aspects that are ingrained into large parts of Western culture.

11) I’m going to cheat and shoutout to @GauntletRPG and @MoreSeatsRPG who both work towards promoting creators that have historically been (and often still are) marginalised within the community. I could highlight one person, they regularly highlight dozens.

12) I’ve got multiple answers to this based on the angle that I look at from. First and foremost – listen and learn when people tell you that something is a problem or preventing/restricting their inclusion. Secondly support and promote. This is something I can do better on, I try and back interesting games where I can but monetarily there is a limit to what I can spend. Spreading the word about them? That’s free and is something I need to do more.

As a creator I have a few approaches that I use. I try and keep my text non-gendered unless I am specifically talking about somebody whose gender has been defined. When creating characters I define stats and then randomly assign aspects such as gender/race. Then I go back and check if there is a significant imbalance – do I have a broad mix. I’m a straight, cis, white guy, it would be mentally easy to fall back on cultural defaults. Having a process prevents that and also works to redefine those mental defaults.

13) Not at present and I have no plans to do so any time soon.

14) This is another difficult one to answer. As a creator in a position of privilege, I could not tell these stories without appropriating them. That’s not for me to do, so largely I again fall back on trying to support and promoting those that do. The big thing I can do though is to try and not reinforce the issues that intersectionality deals with. I actively try and diversify characters and concepts, to go against negative stereotypes or expectations.

15) In general I aim to avoid negative ones but they’re not something I think I have actively gone out of my way to subvert.

16) Shape may be a better word here but I do most of my design thinking in bursts during my commute, so I tend a lot towards short notes, scribbled down or stuck into OneNote. That’s reflected in my material – short adventure starters rather than long texts

17) Again, I don’t have a good answer for this because, for the most part, I’ve been in a position of privilege where I haven’t had to consciously define my identity.

18) Loosely that good needs to triumph over evil/darkness but that’s very much because the adventures and games I’ve made to date tend to follow very typical storytelling conventions. There’s a situation, heroes vanquish it, the day is saved. I want to branch out more in the future. The missions I’m putting together for The Sprawl are a start because they’re ambiguous. Teams may be in conflict with monolithic amoral Corps but they’re rarely heroes, they’re professionals seeking a profit.

19) More catch up after the long weekend and once again a bit of a non-answer in that I don’t know if I have any. I’m still at that point as a creator where I’m figuring out what I enjoy exploring the most.

20) I’ve still no idea if anybody that has downloaded TowerFall, the expanded version of my @200WordRPG entry has actually played it or wants to.

21) Time management, procrastination, dedicating my spare time to just sitting and writing when I have so many other that I could be doing. You know, the usual.

22) Broadly I’m trying to listen and being open to other ideas/perspectives. I’m getting better at trying to boost other voices but still trying to find the balance between supporting and constantly spamming RTs (which I personally dislike when others do)

23) Nothing formal or direct but I feel like indirectly all the podcasts I listen to have been a massive help in driving me to reflect on my gaming and GMing.

24) Scenes. A lot of my adventures originate with a single scene. There’s the saying that ‘everybody has a book in them’ but honestly I don’t think I do. I love setting up scenes and seeing how they play out but I’m terrible at linking everything together. It’s why I write what I call adventure starters/outlines. They’re literally that, the frameworks to set up an adventure with the outlines just having more detail than the starters. How they link up? That’s down to the players & GM. Channel Surfing, my first Demon Hunters adventure outline started off with what if questions for 2 scenes – “What if the zombies started dancing to thriller mid fight” and “What if the PCs met Count von Count as he struggled with his darker self?”

25) Again, bit of a non-answer as I’ve primarily been a solo creator. There are plenty of amazing people on #rpg twitter doing a lot to discuss diversity and inclusivity and companies are starting to actively include consultants. Without having worked with any though I can’t really say who is rad or not. It’s something I’d like to change in the future but that requires the funds to do so, which I don’t have at present.

26) An easy one for once – @happyjacksrpg

27) Mostly Twitter and a couple of specific discords but it’s not something I have put a lot of effort in to date. Until I start regularly releasing material it is difficult to consistently market it.

28) My most valuable tool – my notebook. Seriously, as much as I use onenote for writing up first drafts across various devices I’d be lost without a physical notebook. I scribble down ideas, stats, concepts etc with lots of interlinking and colour coding.

29) It’s difficult to tell whether it is a new trend or down to me widening my awareness but small form games, especially in the zine format seem to be on the up. Licensed settings also seem to be on the up, primarily in the traditional games sphere.

30) If I could change one thing about the industry serious answer – Clear out the bad actors that keep bringing it down. Historically and currently there are too many within it (and in society in general). Lighthearted answer – Reduce the dominance of #DnD, there are so many other games out there and while I understand why D&D is so big I want all those new players to experience and enjoy the diverse range of games that are out there.