#AprilTTRPGmaker Roundup

I’m quite fond of attempting the daily post challenges that pop up on Twitter, they provide a quick way to engage with the RPG industry outside of my own little corner of it and more often than not get me thinking about aspects of it that I may not have spent as long on as I should. The April TTRPG maker challenge has been no exception, particularly with its inclusion of questions that have asked me to think about the status quo and my place within it. Below, my daily answers, which turned out to be far longer than I had originally expected. Thanks go to @kiranansi for putting it together – check their profile for more of their work including More Seats at the Table, an email newsletter designed to highlight games by creators from marganalised communities.

aprilTTRPGmaker

1) I’m Craig – geek, gamer, geneticist based in Liverpool, UK and I publish under the umbrella of LunarShadow Designs

2) My published material so far has been adventure starters for @DG_DemonHunters Demon Hunters: A Comedy of Terrors RPG. Later in the year will also see releases of adventures for @Upto4Players Crystal Heart and @TheSprawl_RPG (in collaboration with @HyveMynd)

3) Commuting. Most of my time to and from work is spent thinking about RPGs or jotting down ideas (notebook/one note). My old London commute was even long enough to do bursts of writing or layout.

4) Not entirely sure, I like variety. I guess the closest answer I have is ones with clear conclusions. I much prefer a single clear and central arc for a campaign and would rather a fixed duration than open ended games. Is that a scenario though? I don’t know.

5) At the table – Characters. While I enjoy worldbuilding in my experience it rarely gets seen. It’s a valuable prep aid for GMs but ultimately the characters have greater impact based on their choices at the table.

6) While there are games where I’d happily spend the evening reading then just for the enjoyment I get out of their world building (L5R, Corporation, Demon Hunters) for actually running games I am slowly shifting towards shorter texts. It helps that these days my system preferences tend towards games that avoid pages of virtually identical weapons or hundreds of creatures each with a full page of stats etc

7) The first of probably many difficult questions. In terms of cost I can see the arguments for lower entry price points but many professionals seem to struggle to make a living and actually, I think RPGs are often incredible value for money per hour of play. Regards disabilities first and foremost speak to those who are affected. One relatively easy thing I think we can do is release plain text files alongside regular PDFs. Fancy layout and backgrounds look nice but aren’t accessible for a lot of people.

8) I’ve only had the pleasure of working with a small number of people, all of whom are amazing. @emzyesque on my @DG_DemonHunters material, @HyveMynd with our missions for @TheSprawl_RPG and @Upto4Players who offered me my first commissioned writing credit. There are plenty of others I would love to work with in the future but before I get to that point I need to clear the backlog of my own personal projects.

9) They largely follow a traditional asymmetric setup with a GM taking on a lot of the perceived ‘power’ of defining elements. Overall I don’t have any issues with that so long as everybody, GM included, understands and respects the different roles.

That said with Project Cassandra one of the things I have tried to do is shift some of the ‘power’ to the players (which I’m defining here as anybody who isn’t the GM) in a way that explicitly fits with the setup – individuals with psychic powers. The PCs all possess precognitive abilities so it makes thematic sense for them to occasionally control & define significant narrative details. The rest of the time it is out of their control, thematically in line with the emergence of the conspiracy.

This isn’t to say that every game should be that way. I want to experiment more with shared narrative control and mechanisms where the ‘power’ at the table shifts during play. But that’s in the future, once I’ve finished my existing projects.

10) This is one of the questions where I am going to hold my hand up and say I don’t know if they do and that I need to do more work to learn about the issues, especially the subtler aspects that are ingrained into large parts of Western culture.

11) I’m going to cheat and shoutout to @GauntletRPG and @MoreSeatsRPG who both work towards promoting creators that have historically been (and often still are) marginalised within the community. I could highlight one person, they regularly highlight dozens.

12) I’ve got multiple answers to this based on the angle that I look at from. First and foremost – listen and learn when people tell you that something is a problem or preventing/restricting their inclusion. Secondly support and promote. This is something I can do better on, I try and back interesting games where I can but monetarily there is a limit to what I can spend. Spreading the word about them? That’s free and is something I need to do more.

As a creator I have a few approaches that I use. I try and keep my text non-gendered unless I am specifically talking about somebody whose gender has been defined. When creating characters I define stats and then randomly assign aspects such as gender/race. Then I go back and check if there is a significant imbalance – do I have a broad mix. I’m a straight, cis, white guy, it would be mentally easy to fall back on cultural defaults. Having a process prevents that and also works to redefine those mental defaults.

13) Not at present and I have no plans to do so any time soon.

14) This is another difficult one to answer. As a creator in a position of privilege, I could not tell these stories without appropriating them. That’s not for me to do, so largely I again fall back on trying to support and promoting those that do. The big thing I can do though is to try and not reinforce the issues that intersectionality deals with. I actively try and diversify characters and concepts, to go against negative stereotypes or expectations.

15) In general I aim to avoid negative ones but they’re not something I think I have actively gone out of my way to subvert.

16) Shape may be a better word here but I do most of my design thinking in bursts during my commute, so I tend a lot towards short notes, scribbled down or stuck into OneNote. That’s reflected in my material – short adventure starters rather than long texts

17) Again, I don’t have a good answer for this because, for the most part, I’ve been in a position of privilege where I haven’t had to consciously define my identity.

18) Loosely that good needs to triumph over evil/darkness but that’s very much because the adventures and games I’ve made to date tend to follow very typical storytelling conventions. There’s a situation, heroes vanquish it, the day is saved. I want to branch out more in the future. The missions I’m putting together for The Sprawl are a start because they’re ambiguous. Teams may be in conflict with monolithic amoral Corps but they’re rarely heroes, they’re professionals seeking a profit.

19) More catch up after the long weekend and once again a bit of a non-answer in that I don’t know if I have any. I’m still at that point as a creator where I’m figuring out what I enjoy exploring the most.

20) I’ve still no idea if anybody that has downloaded TowerFall, the expanded version of my @200WordRPG entry has actually played it or wants to.

21) Time management, procrastination, dedicating my spare time to just sitting and writing when I have so many other that I could be doing. You know, the usual.

22) Broadly I’m trying to listen and being open to other ideas/perspectives. I’m getting better at trying to boost other voices but still trying to find the balance between supporting and constantly spamming RTs (which I personally dislike when others do)

23) Nothing formal or direct but I feel like indirectly all the podcasts I listen to have been a massive help in driving me to reflect on my gaming and GMing.

24) Scenes. A lot of my adventures originate with a single scene. There’s the saying that ‘everybody has a book in them’ but honestly I don’t think I do. I love setting up scenes and seeing how they play out but I’m terrible at linking everything together. It’s why I write what I call adventure starters/outlines. They’re literally that, the frameworks to set up an adventure with the outlines just having more detail than the starters. How they link up? That’s down to the players & GM. Channel Surfing, my first Demon Hunters adventure outline started off with what if questions for 2 scenes – “What if the zombies started dancing to thriller mid fight” and “What if the PCs met Count von Count as he struggled with his darker self?”

25) Again, bit of a non-answer as I’ve primarily been a solo creator. There are plenty of amazing people on #rpg twitter doing a lot to discuss diversity and inclusivity and companies are starting to actively include consultants. Without having worked with any though I can’t really say who is rad or not. It’s something I’d like to change in the future but that requires the funds to do so, which I don’t have at present.

26) An easy one for once – @happyjacksrpg

27) Mostly Twitter and a couple of specific discords but it’s not something I have put a lot of effort in to date. Until I start regularly releasing material it is difficult to consistently market it.

28) My most valuable tool – my notebook. Seriously, as much as I use onenote for writing up first drafts across various devices I’d be lost without a physical notebook. I scribble down ideas, stats, concepts etc with lots of interlinking and colour coding.

29) It’s difficult to tell whether it is a new trend or down to me widening my awareness but small form games, especially in the zine format seem to be on the up. Licensed settings also seem to be on the up, primarily in the traditional games sphere.

30) If I could change one thing about the industry serious answer – Clear out the bad actors that keep bringing it down. Historically and currently there are too many within it (and in society in general). Lighthearted answer – Reduce the dominance of #DnD, there are so many other games out there and while I understand why D&D is so big I want all those new players to experience and enjoy the diverse range of games that are out there.

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